Communication, management and your own context
Communication, management and your own context

This free course is available to start right now. Review the full course description and key learning outcomes and create an account and enrol if you want a free statement of participation.

Free course

Communication, management and your own context

8 Listening and speaking

8.1 Listening and speaking Part 1

We will now complete some listening and speaking activities. In the listening activities, you will hear recorded interviews and talks from TV and radio or the internet, by people working in the field of business. The aim is for you to become familiar with different styles of speaking and accents, and be able to pick out the main points from spoken texts so that you can discuss them.

Our first listening activity concerns a radio programme from the BBC World Service, called Global Business. The programme is about the Fairtrade movement. But before you do the listening activity, you need to think about what Fairtrade means. Don’t worry if you have never heard of the term before. You can have a good idea of what it means by looking at the two words that it is composed of: fair + trade.

Activity 12

Purpose: to practise deducing the meaning of words from their context.

Task: look up the word fair in your dictionary and see what different meanings it can have. Then decide which meaning you think it has in the word Fairtrade.

Answer

The word fair has the following meanings:

  • right, reasonable (e.g. ‘It didn’t seem fair to make her go’)
  • quite a large amount (e.g. ‘He works a fair distance away’)
  • average in standard (e.g. ‘She has a fair command of French’)
  • light-coloured (e.g. ‘A tall, fair Polish man’).

In Fairtrade, the word fair has the first meaning: right, reasonable.

Fairtrade = trade that is fair

But what sort of trade are we talking about here? What sort of movement is the Fairtrade movement? Don’t worry if you don’t know or are not completely sure – you will find out the answers when you listen to the radio programme in the next activity. However, if you want to, you can carry out a quick search on the internet to find out some more information about Fairtrade.

Activity 13

Purpose: to practise gaining information from a spoken text.

Sequence 1

Task: listen to the introduction to the radio programme (from the beginning of the programme to timestamp 01:30) to find answers to the questions below. Then, for each question, choose one of the options as the correct answer.

Download this audio clip.Audio player: Introduction - radio programme: sequence 1
Skip transcript: Introduction - radio programme: sequence 1

Transcript: Introduction - radio programme: sequence 1

Programme presenter
Hello and welcome to Global Business. And this week some big questions about the phenomenon called ‘fairtrade’. In a globalising world, consumers are able to ask questions and get answers about subjects that were simply closed to them in the past. ‘Where do the things I buy come from? ‘How are they made? And what part of what I pay for the goods in a developed-world shop actually gets back to the producers and the farmers.’ As we know, a developing movement has grown out of those kinds of ideas. It seems to have taken shape some forty years ago in the 1960s, though there have been elements of it in movements going back well into the nineteenth century. And the movement has grown. So that now in many countries, certain fair-trade producers are on wide sale in the supermarkets. Standards have been agreed for what the term ‘fair trade’ actually means, and there are now a number of non-government organisations busy setting standards, inspecting supplies and training farmers and growers. Coffee and bananas were the first widely sold fair-trade products. There are now many, including spices, coffee, tea, rice, bananas, mangoes, cocoa, cotton, sugar, honey, fruit juices, nuts, fresh fruit, dried fruit, quinoa, herbs and spices, wine and even footballs. Coffee remains the biggest fairtrade product by value and a very valuable international-traded product it is too.Well, the London School of Economics has gathered several interested people together for a debate on ‘Who owns fairtrade?’: an attempt to examine the question of who really benefits from fair trade as it is at the moment: the producers, the consumers, the farmers, the businesses set up under the fairtrade banner, or all of them?Let’s hear from our panel of fair-traders. Introduce yourselves please.
Kate Seabag
My name’s Kate Seabag. I founded Tropical Wholefoods, which is a fair-trade importer of tropical dried fruits and nuts, and also manufacturers of cereal bars, using fair-trade dried fruit and nut ingredients
Pauline Tiffin
My name’s Pauline Tiffin, and I’ve been working for more than twenty years with small-scale producers in Africa and Latin America, bringing their goods to market and then, as a result of seeing how the products were sold in the end market, moving into branding, brand management.
Programme presenter
You’ve actually founded two companies with quite famous brands in Britain, haven’t you?
Pauline Tiffin
I have. I was a co-founder of what they call ‘breakthrough brands’ – that is, pioneer brands that change the nature of a particular sector – and that’s Cafe Direct, which entered the market fifteen years ago, and later, Divine Chocolate, which was a chocolate range designed to take on the major chocolate companies which were doing very little about their corporate social responsibility at that time
Katie Stafford
I’m Katie Stafford. I work at Price WaterhouseCoopers, and I’m a consultant for the retail and consumer industry.I’m helping them to become more sustainable and looking at their sustainability and climate-change strategy.
David Gabonga
I am David Gabonga. I come from Malawi. I am representing the National Smallholder Farmers Association of Malawi (NASFAM), and some of our farmers are growing ground nuts, you call them peanuts here, that are going to the fair-trade markets in the UK.
End transcript: Introduction - radio programme: sequence 1
Copy this transcript to the clipboard
Print this transcript
Introduction - radio programme: sequence 1
Interactive feature not available in single page view (see it in standard view).

1 Fairtrade is concerned with:

a. 

products produced in developing countries and sold in developing countries


b. 

products produced in developing countries and sold in developed countries


c. 

products produced in developed countries and sold in developing countries


d. 

products produced in developed countries and sold in developed countries


The correct answer is b.

2 Fairtrade is:

a. 

an old movement


b. 

a recent movement


The correct answer is a.

3 A typical Fairtrade product is:

a. 

cars


b. 

electronic goods


c. 

coffee


d. 

clothing


The correct answer is c.

Sequence 2: first listening

Task 1: think about the different people involved in Fairtrade, some based in the developing world and some in the developed world, and the types of job that they do. Do you think it is likely that all the people with the jobs listed below are involved in the Fairtrade movement?

  • Farmers
  • Shopkeepers
  • Factory workers
  • Importers
  • Teachers
  • Company founders
  • Consultants
  • Farmer representatives.

Task 2: listen to the next sequence of the radio programme (from timestamp 01:30 to the end), in which four people who are connected to the Fairtrade movement introduce themselves. Don’t worry if you don’t understand every word. For the moment, it is enough to get a general idea of what you are hearing. When you have listened to these introductions, complete the quiz below.

Download this audio clip.Audio player: Sequence 2: first listening
Skip transcript: Sequence 2: first listening

Transcript: Sequence 2: first listening

Programme presenter
Hello and welcome to Global Business. And this week some big questions about the phenomenon called ‘fairtrade’. In a globalising world, consumers are able to ask questions and get answers about subjects that were simply closed to them in the past. ‘Where do the things I buy come from? ‘How are they made? And what part of what I pay for the goods in a developed-world shop actually gets back to the producers and the farmers.’ As we know, a developing movement has grown out of those kinds of ideas. It seems to have taken shape some forty years ago in the 1960s, though there have been elements of it in movements going back well into the nineteenth century. And the movement has grown. So that now in many countries, certain fair-trade producers are on wide sale in the supermarkets. Standards have been agreed for what the term ‘fair trade’ actually means, and there are now a number of non-government organisations busy setting standards, inspecting supplies and training farmers and growers. Coffee and bananas were the first widely sold fair-trade products. There are now many, including spices, coffee, tea, rice, bananas, mangoes, cocoa, cotton, sugar, honey, fruit juices, nuts, fresh fruit, dried fruit, quinoa, herbs and spices, wine and even footballs. Coffee remains the biggest fairtrade product by value and a very valuable international-traded product it is too.Well, the London School of Economics has gathered several interested people together for a debate on ‘Who owns fairtrade?’: an attempt to examine the question of who really benefits from fairtrade as it is at the moment: the producers, the consumers, the farmers, the businesses set up under the fairtrade banner, or all of them? Let’s hear from our panel of fair-traders. Introduce yourselves please.
Kate Seabag
My name’s Kate Seabag. I founded Tropical Wholefoods, which is a fair-trade importer of tropical dried fruits and nuts, and also manufacturers of cereal bars, using fair-trade dried fruit and nut ingredients
Pauline Tiffin
My name’s Pauline Tiffin, and I’ve been working for more than twenty years with small-scale producers in Africa and Latin America, bringing their goods to market and then, as a result of seeing how the products were sold in the end market, moving into branding, brand management.
Programme presenter
You’ve actually founded two companies with quite famous brands in Britain, haven’t you?
Pauline Tiffin
I have. I was a co-founder of what they call ‘breakthrough brands’ – that is, pioneer brands that change the nature of a particular sector – and that’s Cafe Direct, which entered the market fifteen years ago, and later, Divine Chocolate, which was a chocolate range designed to take on the major chocolate companies which were doing very little about their corporate social responsibility at that time
Katie Stafford
I’m Katie Stafford. I work at Price WaterhouseCoopers, and I’m a consultant for the retail and consumer industry. I’m helping them to become more sustainable and looking at their sustainability and climate-change strategy.
David Gabonga
I am David Gabonga. I come from Malawi. I am representing the National Smallholder Farmers Association of Malawi (NASFAM), and some of our farmers are growing ground nuts, you call them peanuts here, that are going to the fair-trade markets in the UK.
End transcript: Sequence 2: first listening
Copy this transcript to the clipboard
Print this transcript
Sequence 2: first listening
Interactive feature not available in single page view (see it in standard view).

1 Do they work in developed or developing countries?

Using the following two lists, match each numbered item with the correct letter.

  1. Developed

  2. Both

  3. Developed

  4. Developing

  • a.Pauline

  • b.Katie

  • c.David

  • d.Kate

The correct answers are:
  • 1 = d
  • 2 = a
  • 3 = b
  • 4 = c

Which developing continents or countries do they mention?

Using the following two lists, match each numbered item with the correct letter.

  1. Not applicable

  2. Africa and Latin America

  3. Not applicable

  4. Malawi

  • a.Pauline

  • b.Katie

  • c.Kate

  • d.David

The correct answers are:
  • 1 = c
  • 2 = a
  • 3 = b
  • 4 = d

3 Which of the jobs in the list above do they do?

Using the following two lists, match each numbered item with the correct letter.

  1. Importer

  2. Company founder

  3. Consultant

  4. Farmer representative

  • a.Katie

  • b.Pauline

  • c.David

  • d.Kate

The correct answers are:
  • 1 = d
  • 2 = b
  • 3 = a
  • 4 = c

Sequence 2: second listening

Task: listen to the same sequence of the radio programme again. This time, you need to try to understand what is said in more detail. Listen again and answer the questions below by typing your answer into the text box.

Download this audio clip.Audio player: Sequence 2: second listening
Skip transcript: Sequence 2: second listening

Transcript: Sequence 2: second listening

Programme presenter
Hello and welcome to Global Business. And this week some big questions about the phenomenon called ‘fairtrade’. In a globalising world, consumers are able to ask questions and get answers about subjects that were simply closed to them in the past. ‘Where do the things I buy come from? ‘How are they made? And what part of what I pay for the goods in a developed-world shop actually gets back to the producers and the farmers.’ As we know, a developing movement has grown out of those kinds of ideas. It seems to have taken shape some forty years ago in the 1960s, though there have been elements of it in movements going back well into the nineteenth century. And the movement has grown. So that now in many countries, certain fair-trade producers are on wide sale in the supermarkets. Standards have been agreed for what the term ‘fairtrade’ actually means, and there are now a number of non-government organisations busy setting standards, inspecting supplies and training farmers and growers. Coffee and bananas were the first widely sold fair-trade products. There are now many, including spices, coffee, tea, rice, bananas, mangoes, cocoa, cotton, sugar, honey, fruit juices, nuts, fresh fruit, dried fruit, quinoa, herbs and spices, wine and even footballs. Coffee remains the biggest fairtrade product by value and a very valuable international-traded product it is too.Well, the London School of Economics has gathered several interested people together for a debate on ‘Who owns fairtrade?’: an attempt to examine the question of who really benefits from fairtrade as it is at the moment: the producers, the consumers, the farmers, the businesses set up under the fairtrade banner, or all of them? Let’s hear from our panel of fair-traders. Introduce yourselves please.
Kate Seabag
My name’s Kate Seabag. I founded Tropical Wholefoods, which is a fair-trade importer of tropical dried fruits and nuts, and also manufacturers of cereal bars, using fair-trade dried fruit and nut ingredients
Pauline Tiffin
My name’s Pauline Tiffin, and I’ve been working for more than twenty years with small-scale producers in Africa and Latin America, bringing their goods to market and then, as a result of seeing how the products were sold in the end market, moving into branding, brand management.
Programme presenter
You’ve actually founded two companies with quite famous brands in Britain, haven’t you?
Pauline Tiffin
I have. I was a co-founder of what they call ‘breakthrough brands’ – that is, pioneer brands that change the nature of a particular sector – and that’s Cafe Direct, which entered the market fifteen years ago, and later, Divine Chocolate, which was a chocolate range designed to take on the major chocolate companies which were doing very little about their corporate social responsibility at that time
Katie Stafford
I’m Katie Stafford. I work at Price WaterhouseCoopers, and I’m a consultant for the retail and consumer industry. I’m helping them to become more sustainable and looking at their sustainability and climate-change strategy.
David Gabonga
I am David Gabonga. I come from Malawi. I am representing the National Smallholder Farmers Association of Malawi (NASFAM), and some of our farmers are growing ground nuts, you call them peanuts here, that are going to the fair-trade markets in the UK.
End transcript: Sequence 2: second listening
Copy this transcript to the clipboard
Print this transcript
Sequence 2: second listening
Interactive feature not available in single page view (see it in standard view).

1 What does Tropical Wholefoods import?

You can type text here, but this facility requires a free OU account. Sign in or register.
Interactive feature not available in single page view (see it in standard view).

2 What does Tropical Wholefoods manufacture?

You can type text here, but this facility requires a free OU account. Sign in or register.
Interactive feature not available in single page view (see it in standard view).

3 How long has Pauline been working in Fairtrade?

You can type text here, but this facility requires a free OU account. Sign in or register.
Interactive feature not available in single page view (see it in standard view).

4 Why did Pauline found Divine Chocolate?

You can type text here, but this facility requires a free OU account. Sign in or register.
Interactive feature not available in single page view (see it in standard view).

5 What does Katie help companies with?

You can type text here, but this facility requires a free OU account. Sign in or register.
Interactive feature not available in single page view (see it in standard view).

6 Which farmers does David represent?

You can type text here, but this facility requires a free OU account. Sign in or register.
Interactive feature not available in single page view (see it in standard view).

Answer

The answers to the questions are as follows:

  1. Tropical Wholefoods imports dried fruit and nuts.
  2. Tropical Wholefoods manufactures cereal bars.
  3. Pauline has been working in Fairtrade for more than twenty years.
  4. Pauline founded Divine Chocolate to offer a Fairtrade alternative to the products of the major chocolate companies.
  5. Katie helps companies with sustainability and climate change strategy.
  6. David represents smallholder farmers growing groundnuts (peanuts).

The next activity forms the first part of the speaking task. You will give a brief presentation of your job, your work context and your career history.

LB720_1

Take your learning further

Making the decision to study can be a big step, which is why you'll want a trusted University. The Open University has 50 years’ experience delivering flexible learning and 170,000 students are studying with us right now. Take a look at all Open University courses.

If you are new to university level study, find out more about the types of qualifications we offer, including our entry level Access courses and Certificates.

Not ready for University study then browse over 900 free courses on OpenLearn and sign up to our newsletter to hear about new free courses as they are released.

Every year, thousands of students decide to study with The Open University. With over 120 qualifications, we’ve got the right course for you.

Request an Open University prospectus