Communication, management and your own context
Communication, management and your own context

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Communication, management and your own context

8.2 Listening and speaking Part 2

Activity 14

Purpose: to record a short spoken introduction of yourself and present it to fellow students and tutors, and to respond orally to questions in order to practise speaking in a conversation.

Task 1: prepare a short summary of your own details. You should use the profile you wrote for Activity 9. You may like to use the transcript for the audio recording you listened to in Activity 13 as a model of how to structure your summary.

Comment

Information in a written text can be used to produce a spoken text. As a manager, you are constantly having to move from one language skill to another – for example:

  • converting a written text into a spoken text
  • listening to a spoken text and taking notes
  • transforming your notes into a presentation and then writing them up as part of a report.

Purpose: to learn some expressions to talk about your job.

Task 2: in the radio programme that you listened to in Activity 13, the four people used the following expressions to introduce themselves and talk about their job and what it involves:

  1. ‘I founded (company name)’ ‘I work at (company name)’ ‘I’m a (job title)’ ‘I’ve been working for (time period) with (name of company/people)’ ‘I come from (name of country)’ ‘I’m representing (name of association).’
  2. ‘(My company) is an importer of …’ ‘(My company) is a manufacturer of (product), using (material)’ ‘(My company) entered the market (number of) years ago.’
  3. ‘(A product) was designed to (reason behind product).’
  4. ‘As a result of _________ing, (I/the company) moved into (new sector).’

Task 3: can you use these expressions to talk about your own job and working context? Try to make some sentences and note these down.

Comment

Of course, you can use other expressions, not just the ones listed here. This is what one student wrote:

I work at Fiat, which is a large Italian manufacturer of cars and road vehicles. I’ve been working there for 5 years, and I am a regional sales manager. After university I worked in Fiat’s marketing department, but I moved into sales after a few years. Fiat was one of the first companies to enter the automobile market and it is now a market leader. Its latest model is the Qubo which was designed to compete with cheaper Japanese imports and offer a more environmentally friendly product.

Task 4: you now need to record the paragraph that you have written about your job.

You can record your response here, but this facility requires a free OU account. Sign in or register.
Interactive feature not available in single page view (see it in standard view).

Activity 15

Task 1:

Purpose: to review how to form questions.

Think about the information that you heard in the radio programme. There were four speakers, and you heard some brief information about their jobs and work contexts. Imagine you could meet these four people. What information would you like to know about them? What questions could you ask them?

Task 2:

The quiz below contains some possible questions you might ask. Which speaker would these be appropriate questions for? Match each question with the appropriate speaker by selecting their names. There can be multiple answers for some questions. For example, the first question (‘Where does your company import goods from?’) is a suitable question for Kate and Pauline because they both own companies that import Fairtrade foods. Katie’s company and David’s association do not import goods.

Question 1

1 Where does your company import goods from?

a. 

Kate


b. 

Pauline


c. 

Katie


d. 

David


The correct answers are a and b.

Question 2

2 Has your company been successful?

a. 

Kate


b. 

Pauline


c. 

Katie


d. 

David


The correct answers are a, b and c.

Question 3

3 What’s the thing you like most about your job?

a. 

Kate


b. 

Pauline


c. 

Katie


d. 

David


The correct answers are a, b, c and d.

Question 4

4 Is it a big organisation (or association)?

a. 

Kate


b. 

Pauline


c. 

Katie


d. 

David


The correct answers are a, b, c and d.

Question 5

5 Who are your main customers?

a. 

Kate


b. 

Pauline


c. 

Katie


d. 

David


The correct answers are a, b and d.

Question 6

6 Who are your main clients?

a. 

Kate


b. 

Pauline


c. 

Katie


d. 

David


The correct answer is c.

Question 7

7 What other things do you grow?

a. 

Kate


b. 

Pauline


c. 

Katie


d. 

David


The correct answer is d.

Question 8

8 What other products does your company sell?

a. 

Kate


b. 

Pauline


c. 

Katie


d. 

David


The correct answers are a and b.

Question 9

9 What other services does your company provide?

a. 

Kate


b. 

Pauline


c. 

Katie


d. 

David


The correct answer is c.

Activity 16

Purpose: to learn how to say questions.

Task 1

Look again at the nine questions in the activity above. Try saying these questions out loud. When you say the questions, does your voice go up or down at the end?

Here are three possible rules for saying questions. Which do you think is the correct one?

  1. When we say questions, our voice always goes down at the end.
  2. When we say questions, our voice always goes up at the end.
  3. When we say questions, our voice sometimes goes down and sometimes goes up at the end.

Task 2

Listen to the audio recordings of the questions below and notice how the speaker asks the questions. Does his voice go up or down at the end of each question? Which of the three rules listed above is the correct one?

1 Where does your company import goods from?

Download this audio clip.Audio player: lb720_2010e_s1_au002.mp3
Interactive feature not available in single page view (see it in standard view).

2 Has your company been successful?

Download this audio clip.Audio player: lb720_2010e_s1_au003.mp3
Interactive feature not available in single page view (see it in standard view).

3 What’s the thing you like most about your job?

Download this audio clip.Audio player: lb720_2010e_s1_au004.mp3
Interactive feature not available in single page view (see it in standard view).

4 Is it a big organisation?

Download this audio clip.Audio player: lb720_2010e_s1_au005.mp3
Interactive feature not available in single page view (see it in standard view).

5 Who are your main customers?

Download this audio clip.Audio player: lb720_2010e_s1_au006.mp3
Interactive feature not available in single page view (see it in standard view).

6 Who are your main clients?

Download this audio clip.Audio player: lb720_2010e_s1_au007.mp3
Interactive feature not available in single page view (see it in standard view).

7 What other things do you grow?

Download this audio clip.Audio player: lb720_2010e_s1_au008.mp3
Interactive feature not available in single page view (see it in standard view).

8 What other products does your company sell?

Download this audio clip.Audio player: lb720_2010e_s1_au009.mp3
Interactive feature not available in single page view (see it in standard view).

9 What other services does your company provide?

Download this audio clip.Audio player: lb720_2010e_s1_au010.mp3
Interactive feature not available in single page view (see it in standard view).

Answer

Task 2

The speaker’s voice goes down at the end for all the questions, except for Questions 2 and 4, when his voice goes up at the end. This is because how the voice sounds depends on the type of question that is being asked.

If it is a ‘yes/no’ question (i.e. it can be answered with ‘yes’ or ‘no’), then the voice usually goes up. If it is a ‘wh-’ question (i.e. the question starts with ‘what’, ‘which’, ‘when’, ‘why’ or ‘who’) or a ‘how’ question, then the voice usually goes down.

The correct rule is therefore the third one.

Task 3:

Now listen again to the audio recordings and practise saying the questions after the speaker. Try to imitate how the speaker says them. In particular, try to copy the way that the speaker’s voice goes up or down at the end of each question.

1 Where does your company import goods from?

Download this audio clip.Audio player: lb720_2010e_s1_au002.mp3
Interactive feature not available in single page view (see it in standard view).

2 Has your company been successful?

Download this audio clip.Audio player: lb720_2010e_s1_au003.mp3
Interactive feature not available in single page view (see it in standard view).

3 What’s the thing you like most about your job?

Download this audio clip.Audio player: lb720_2010e_s1_au004.mp3
Interactive feature not available in single page view (see it in standard view).

4 Is it a big organisation?

Download this audio clip.Audio player: lb720_2010e_s1_au005.mp3
Interactive feature not available in single page view (see it in standard view).

5 Who are your main customers?

Download this audio clip.Audio player: lb720_2010e_s1_au006.mp3
Interactive feature not available in single page view (see it in standard view).

6 Who are your main clients?

Download this audio clip.Audio player: lb720_2010e_s1_au007.mp3
Interactive feature not available in single page view (see it in standard view).

7 What other things do you grow?

Download this audio clip.Audio player: lb720_2010e_s1_au008.mp3
Interactive feature not available in single page view (see it in standard view).

8 What other products does your company sell?

Download this audio clip.Audio player: lb720_2010e_s1_au009.mp3
Interactive feature not available in single page view (see it in standard view).

9 What other services does your company provide?

Download this audio clip.Audio player: lb720_2010e_s1_au010.mp3
Interactive feature not available in single page view (see it in standard view).
LB720_1

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