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Discovering computer networks: hands on in the Open Networking Lab
Discovering computer networks: hands on in the Open Networking Lab

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1.3 Packet Tracer Anywhere

As part of your work in this course, you will be building networks in a simulator called Packet Tracer Anywhere. This part introduces you to the simulator.

There are two short videos to watch followed by an activity. When you’ve completed this part you should be able to use the ipconfig and ping commands in Packet Tracer Anywhere.

Watch the video below, which is about 2 minutes long. It introduces you to Packet Tracer Anywhere.

Introduction to Packet Tracer Anywhere – What is it?

Download this video clip.Video player: 07_intro_to_packet_tracer_what_is_it.mp4
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Interactive feature not available in single page view (see it in standard view).

Having seen how Packet Tracer Anywhere looks in a browser now watch the video below, which is about 4.5 minutes long. It shows you the basics of using Packet Tracer Anywhere.

Introduction to Packet Tracer Anywhere – How to use it

Download this video clip.Video player: 08_intro_to_packet_tracer_how_to_use_it.mp4
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Interactive feature not available in single page view (see it in standard view).

Activity 7 Try it out

5 minutes

  • Open PT Anywhere [Tip: hold Ctrl and click a link to open it in a new tab. (Hide tip)] in a new tab or window so you can read these instructions. One of the PCs on this PT Anywhere network is not working properly. From PC0, send a ping to its network broadcast address and use the reply to find out which of PC1 and PC2 is malfunctioning. (Hint: First you will need to discover PC0’s IP address to work out what the network broadcast address is. When you send a ping to the network’s broadcast address, the reply from the address ending with ‘.1’ is from the router.)

  • The malfunctioning PC is PC2 with an IP address of 192.167.2.150.

    To reach this conclusion you need to discover PC0’s IP address by selecting it and then going to ‘Edit device’, then ‘Interfaces’. You should have found that its IP address is 192.168.2.50 and therefore the network broadcast address is 192.168.2.255. The next step was to double-click on PC0 to open the command prompt and enter ping 192.168.2.255. The reply shows that PC0 can only talk to the device with IP address 192.168.2.1 (which is the router, as indicated in the hint to the previous question) and to the PC with IP address 192.168.2.100. It’s easy to discover that 192.168.2.100 is PC1 by checking PC1’s ‘Interfaces’ settings. Therefore it is PC2 that is malfunctioning. This PC has an IP address of 192.167.2.150.

  • Change the IP address of PC2 to 192.168.2.150 then resend the ping to the broadcast address from PC0. What is the result?

  • The ping returned replies from 192.168.2.1, 192.168.2.100 and 192.168.2.150.

  • What can you deduce from this?

  • PC2’s original IP address of 192.167.2.150 was inappropriate for this network. (In Session 2 you will find out why this address was inappropriate.)