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Discovering computer networks: hands on in the Open Networking Lab
Discovering computer networks: hands on in the Open Networking Lab

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4.3 More on routing

Now watch the following video, which is about 2 minutes long.

More on routing

Download this video clip.Video player: 23_more_on_routing.mp4
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Activity 4 Think about

5 minutes

In the previous session you were asked why it might not be a good idea to have too many devices connected by just switches. Can you think how routers might help?

Answer

All devices connected by a switch will be in the same broadcast domain, which you saw previously means all devices will receive and have to process any broadcast packets. Routers do not forward broadcasts by default and therefore break up broadcast domains.

Now watch the following video, which is about 3 minutes long.

Routers in Packet Tracer

Download this video clip.Video player: 24_routers_in_packet_tracer.mp4
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Activity 5 Try it out

5 minutes

  • 1. Open PT Anywhere [Tip: hold Ctrl and click a link to open it in a new tab. (Hide tip)] in a new tab or window so you can read these instructions. There are two networks connected by two routers.

  • 2. Can PC0 on the first network send messages to PC1 on the same network?

    Click Reveal answer if you would like a hint.

  • You will need to find the IP addresses of both PCs and ping from PC0 to PC1. You should find this is working OK.

Now watch the following video about configuring routers, which is about 4 minutes long. In the video the speaker refers to a serial connection. This is a type of connection sometimes used to join routers.

Configuring routers

Download this video clip.Video player: 25_configuring_routers.mp4
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Now watch the following video about using the configured routers as a network, which is about 5 minutes long.

Using the configured routers

Download this video clip.Video player: 26_using_the_configured_routers.mp4
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Activity 6 Sort it out

10 minutes

  • 2. Can PC0 on the first network send messages to PC2 on the other network?

    Click Reveal answer if you would like a hint.

  • You will need to find the IP addresses of both PCs and ping from PC0 to PC2. You should find it doesn’t work.

  • 3. Can you identify what the problems might be in sending messages from one network to the other?

    Click Reveal answer if you would like a hint.

  • Router0 is OK, but Router1 should have the FastEthernet0/0 and Serial2/0 interfaces configured. We also haven’t checked the RIP settings on the routers.

    You haven’t yet covered how to do this at the command line (which is the only option in PT Anywhere) but you will be looking at how this is done later in the course.