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Discovering computer networks: hands on in the Open Networking Lab
Discovering computer networks: hands on in the Open Networking Lab

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16.1 Device connections

A local company has tasked you with configuring their routers to provide two branch offices with connectivity to their DNS server, which is connected to their central router located in the head office. Branch office A is using IPv4 and Branch office B is using IPv6. The routers will need to be configured so that both offices can access the server.

You will see how the network below is configured, tested and saved.

Watch the video below, which is about 2.5 minutes long. It shows this network being built in Packet Tracer.

Device connections

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Activity 1 Test yourself

5 minutes

In this scenario, PC-A1 is shown as being in network 172.20.16.0/23 and PC-A2 is shown as being in network 172.20.18.0/24. For both of these networks, write out the subnet mask in dotted decimal.

Answer

In CIDR notation a /23 subnet mask indicates that there are 23 bits in the network part of the address and 9 bits in the host part. In binary this would be shown as 11111111.11111111.11111110.00000000 which converts to 255.255.254.0 in dotted decimal.

A /24 mask indicates that there are 24 bits in the network part and 8 bits in the host part. In binary this would be shown as 11111111.11111111.11111111.00000000 or 255.255.255.0 in dotted decimal.