Knowledge technologies in context
Knowledge technologies in context

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Knowledge technologies in context

Acknowledgements

This course was written by Simon Buckingham Shum

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see terms and conditions [Tip: hold Ctrl and click a link to open it in a new tab. (Hide tip)] ), this content is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Licence

Course image: Wonderlane in Flickr made available under Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Licence.

Tables 3.1 and 3.2: Zimmerman, B. and Selvin, A. (1997) 'A framework for assessing group memory approaches for software design projects', Proceedings of ACM DIS ‘97: Conference on Designing Interactive Systems, ACM Press.

Figures 2.1 and 2.2 adapted from Stahl, G. (1993) 'Interpretation in design: the problem of tacit and explicit understanding in computer support for co-operative design', doctoral thesis, November, Department of Computer Science, University of Colorado;

Figure 3.1 Borghoff, U. and Pareschi, R. (eds) (1998) Information Technology for Knowledge Management, Springer-Verlag;

Figure 3.2 van Heijst, G., van der Spek, R. and Kruizinga, E. (1998) 'The lessons learned cycle' in Borghoff, U. and Pareschi, R. (eds) Information Technology for Knowledge Management, Springer-Verlag, pp. 17–34;

Figure 4.1 Jordan, B., Goldman, R. and Eichler, A. (1998) 'A technology for supporting knowledge work: the reptool' in Borghoff, U. and Pareschi, R. (eds) Information Technology for Knowledge Management, Springer-Verlag, pp. 79–97;

Figure 4.3 Repenning, A., Ioannidou, A. and Ambach, J. (1998) 'Learn to communicate and communicate to learn', Journal of Interactive Media in Education, Vol. 98, No. 7, http://www-jime.open.ac.uk/ 98/ 7;

Figure 4.4 HC-REMA (1997) HC-REMA: Health Care Resource Management, European Union Project HC4124.

pp. 6 and 24 © 1998 Randy Glasbergen. World Rights Reserved. Reproduced with permission;

p. 48 © 1997 Randy Glasbergen. World Rights Reserved. Reproduced with permission;

p. 59 © 1996 Ted Goff.

Screen 3 from 'Automating CapCom using mobile agents and robotic assistants', by William Clancey et al. (2005). Copyright © NASA Ames Research Center, University of Southampton and Open University;

Screen 7 from 'Cat-a-Cones: an interactive interface for specifying searches and viewing retrieval results using a large category hierarchy', by Marti Hearst, SIGIR97. Copyright © 1997 Marti Hearst;

Screen 8 Chen, C. (1999) Information Visualisation and Virtual Environments, London, Springer-Verlag.

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