Could we control our climate?
Could we control our climate?

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Could we control our climate?

Acknowledgements

This free course was written by Dr Tamsin Edwards with contributions from Dr Mark Brandon.

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see terms and conditions [Tip: hold Ctrl and click a link to open it in a new tab. (Hide tip)] ), this content is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Licence.

The material acknowledged below is Proprietary and used under licence (not subject to Creative Commons Licence). Grateful acknowledgement is made to the following sources for permission to reproduce material in this free course:

Course image:  courtesy: Mark Brandon.

Figure 1: © Google Inc.

Figure 2: The IPCC AR5 WG1 Report: Image courtesy of Andrew Whitehead

Figure 3: (a) The worldwide network of land stations in the Global Land Surface Meteorological Databank (Rennie et al. 2014). The colour corresponds to the number of years of data available for each station. (b) A snapshot of the locations of the NOAA Observing System Monitoring Center network measuring sea surface temperatures (NOAA, 2016).

Figure 4: Observed annual global mean surface temperature anomalies 1850-2012 from three datasets: Adapted from Figure SPM.1 (a) (top panel) from Climate Change 2014: Synthesis Report. Contribution of Working Groups I, II and III to the Fifth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. [Core Writing Team, Pachauri, R.K. and Meyer, L. (eds.)]. IPCC, Geneva, Switzerland.

Figure 5: from IPCC (2013) Summary for Policymakers: Stocker, T.F. et al. (2013) Climate Change 2013: The Physical Science Basis, IPCC, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, United Kingdom

Figures 6 and 10: courtesy of Gregory Johnson

Figure 7: Observed precipitation changes from 1951 to 2010: IPCC, 2013: Summary for Policymakers. In: Climate Change 2013: The Physical Science Basis. Contribution of Working Group I to the Fifth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change [Stocker, T.F., D. Qin, G.-K. Plattner, M. Tignor, S.K. Allen, J. Boschung, A. Nauels, Y. Xia, V. Bex and P.M. Midgley (eds.)]. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, United Kingdom and New York

Figure 8: courtesy of Tamsin Edwards

Figure 9: Greenland: Reproduced by permission, Dr Poul Christoffersen, Scott Polar Research Institute, Department of Geography, University of Cambridge

Figure 10: Tide staff used by the NOAA ‘Teachers at Sea’ Rosalind Echols and Avery Marvin: Rosalind Echols, NOAA Teacher at Sea

Figure 12: Electoral campaign, courtesy of Isaac Cordal: © Isaac Cordal

Figure 13: John-irishwildcat. http://creativecommons.org/ licenses/ by/ 2.0/

Figure 14: Adapted from Figure 6-4 from Pörtner, H.-O., D. Karl, P.W. Boyd, W. Cheung, S.E. Lluch-Cota, Y. Nojiri, D.N. Schmidt, and P. Zavialov, 2014: Ocean systems. In: Climate Change 2014: Impacts, Adaptation, and Vulnerability. Part A: Global and Sectoral Aspects. Contribution of Working Group II to the Fifth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change [Field, C.B., V.R. Barros, D.J. Dokken, K.J. Mach, M.D. Mastrandrea, T.E. Bilir, M. Chatterjee, K.L. Ebi, Y.O. Estrada, R.C. Genova, B. Girma, E.S. Kissel, A.N. Levy, S. MacCracken, P.R. Mastrandrea, and L.L. White (eds.)]. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, United Kingdom and New York

Figure 15: (a) Morro da Carioca, Angra dos Reis in the State of Rio de Janerio, Brazil, where heavy rain caused fatal mudslides and flooding in January 2010: © Agência Brasil. https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/deed.en (b) A sign in Rawnsley Park Station, South Australia, rendered unnecessary by the 2007-2008 drought: © Peripitus via Wikimedia. https://creativecommons.org/ licenses/ by-sa/ 3.0/ deed.en

Figure 16: (a) Sámi reindeer: © Maisna / iStockphoto.com; Figure 16 (b) Sámi musician Mari Boine: © Henryk Kotowski; https://creativecommons.org/ licenses/ by-sa/ 3.0/ deed.en; Figure 16(c) ‘Team Sámi’ at the Arctic Winter Games in 2014: © Sámediggi Sametinget. https://creativecommons.org/ licenses/ by/ 2.0/;

Video 1: A Song of Our Warming Planet by Daniel Crawford; Institute of the Environment; University of Minnesota and College of Liberal Arts

Every effort has been made to contact copyright owners. If any have been inadvertently overlooked, the publishers will be pleased to make the necessary arrangements at the first opportunity.

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