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This figure consists of two images. The first is a graph from the Economist magazine showing projected US and Chinese growth. Chinese growth is shown as a red line and US Growth is shown as a blue line.

The y (vertical) axis shows trillions of US dollars, given in units of 10, and measured from 0 to 60. The x (horizontal) axis shows years from 2000 to 2025, measured at five year intervals.

The US growth line begins at 10 trillion US dollars in 2000 and rises slowly. The Chinese growth line begins just above 0 trillion US dollars in 2000 and rises steeply. A vertical line shows Chinese growth overtaking US growth in 2018.

A box to the right of the graph explains that the forecast is based on the following assumptions: growth in real GDP is 7.75 for China and 2.5 for the United States; inflation is 4 for China and 1.5 for the United States; and Yuan appreciation is 3. It is explained that inflation and Yuan appreciation deflate GDP.

The second image is a graph from the same source comparing military spending in China and the United States. Chinese spending is shown as a red line and US spending as a blue line. The y (vertical) axis shows trillions of US dollars from 0 to 1.8 in gradations of 0.3. The x (horizontal) axis shows years from 1990 to 2050 in ten year intervals. The graph shows US spending at 0.5 trillion US dollars in 1990, peaking at 0.7 trillion US dollars in 2010, decreasing sharply in 2015 but then increasing more steadily thereafter. Chinese spending is shown starting at 0 in 1990 and increasing steadily from then. The projection shows Chinese military spending overtaking US spending in 2038.

It is explained that the forecast is based on the following assumptions: US GDP growth of 2.7% per year and military spending slowing to 3% GDP, and a gradual reduction in Chinese GDP growth, with military spending at 2.1% GDP.

 2 China and the United States in the twenty-first century