An introduction to public leadership
An introduction to public leadership

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An introduction to public leadership

2.1.3 Improving public value in policing

In this video, Ian Hesketh of the College of Policing, Supt Robyn Williams of the Metropolitan Police and Stephen Greenhalgh, former Deputy Mayor of London, discuss the use of public value to inform improvement and change in policing.

Download this video clip.Video player: ou_futurelearn_police_vid_1015.mp4
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Transcript

IAN HESKETH
Public value in policing is a really useful concept when we talk about how we look at demand and arranging our resources around that demand. It's a current issue that policemen are trying to resolve.
ROBYN WILLIAMS
I think often in policing we have relied on formal performance measures to judge public value. You know it's about our detection rate, how many arrests we've actually made. And that has a place and it does have a value. But actually, I think our value will derive from how our communities feel. When they see us I want communities not to feel frightened and occupied by policing. I want them to see us as approachable, as accessible.
IAN HESKETH
The challenges of improving public value are around how we look at what it is the public want the police to do. So by communicating or engaging with communities, by asking them what it is. So we already do satisfaction surveys, and perception surveys, and things of that nature. But I think we need to mature more and find a way of directly communicating with what is effectively our customers.
STEPHEN GREENHALGH
I think there's an intrinsic tension that the public want immediate results. So the public will see that we are facing a swathe of fraud. And when fraud gets added to the crime statistics, we're talking about, according to the crime survey, 5.1 million fraud offences in a year. That's seismic, it will dwarf crime. It's larger than all forms of crime combined. So therefore, the public want immediate results. Tackle fraud, do something about it. But the reality is that 50 per cent of fraud is committed by criminals that don't live in the United Kingdom. And it's very hard to see a means of catching them and bringing them to justice. So the best you can do is disrupt.
IAN HESKETH
We're seeing rises in different crime types such as child sexual exploitation, indecent images, issues around counter-terrorism. These are not easy things to resolve. So I think the police service itself looks to academia to help us with the evidence base of what works.
STEPHEN GREENHALGH
Terrorism, setting the public expectation with the threat levels where we are today. Of course we can disrupt terrorist plots. And we are doing so and arresting terrorists at the rate of one a day. But eventually someone will get through. And preparing the public for the inevitable impact of an event that we've seen in Paris or in Brussels is very difficult for a politician and also for police leaders. But the public have very high expectations, and it's not always easy to be able to deliver against those.
ROBYN WILLIAMS
Policing continues to grow up. We would like to have thought we were the thin blue line and that it was all about the tactics and all about the equipment that we carry. And yes we have taser, yes there are more armed officers, yes our capability is more sophisticated. But actually, that is not sustainable. We're not here to battle communities; we're here to keep them safe. And keeping them safe is about partnership. Keeping them safe is about all of that early learning, all of those early years. We have cadet programmes. We have other community ambassador programmes. We are in our communities working with them.
End transcript
 
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Activity 1

In their book Public Value: Theory & Practice (2011), Benington and Moore state that one of the following is not a source of public value. Which is it?

a. 

best value


b. 

political value


c. 

ecological value


The correct answer is a.

a. 

Political value is a source of public value derived from stimulating and supporting democratic participation and dialogue. Ecological value is also a source of public value derived from contributing to environmental sustainability. ‘Best value’ is not a source of public value. It is a phrase that is sometimes still used by staff in public sector organisations, which refers to a strategy for financial efficiency adopted during the late 1990s.


Public value is only created by public sector organisations. True or false?

a. 

false


b. 

true


The correct answer is a.

a. 

The private sector and the third sector can also create and add public value. However, one of the key roles of the state and its agencies can be to harness the work of other partners behind clear public value goals and outcomes.


Where was the concept of public value first developed?

a. 

USA


b. 

UK


c. 

Norway


The correct answer is a.

a. 

The concept was first developed by Moore at Harvard University. As he explained in the short video you watched earlier, he developed it during the late 1980s to early 1990s, as a way of articulating the distinctive contribution of public service organisations, and countering some of the political pressures that were being placed at the time on state agencies to shrink their activities.


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