Everyday maths for Health and Social Care and Education Support 1
Everyday maths for Health and Social Care and Education Support 1

Start this free course now. Just create an account and sign in. Enrol and complete the course for a free statement of participation or digital badge if available.

Free course

Everyday maths for Health and Social Care and Education Support 1

3.1 Fractions of amounts

Have a look at the following examples, which demonstrate how you would find the fraction of an amount.

Example: Finding fractions

Sarbjit is selling tickets for a charity concert at a school.

Described image
Figure 13 A singer

one divided by three of the funds raised will go to the school. Sarbjit makes £90 from selling tickets, so how much money will the school receive?

Method

The basic rule for finding a unit fraction of an amount is to divide by the how many parts there are (the number on the bottom of the fraction) and multiply the result by the number at the top of the fraction:

one divided by three of £90 is the same as £90 ÷ 3 = £30

The sum £30 × 1 = £30, so you would get £30 off.

Survey

In a survey, three divided by four of respondents said that they eat less than five portions of fruit and vegetables each day. If 800 people were surveyed, how many people eat less than five portions of fruit and vegetables each day?

Method

Again, to find a fraction of an amount you need to divide by the number at the bottom of the fraction and then multiply that result by the number at the top of the fraction:

To answer this you need to first work out what one divided by four of 800 people is.

one divided by four of 800 = 800 ÷ 4 = 200

Then use the numerator (the top of the fraction) to work out how many of those unit fractions are needed:

three divided by four of 800 = 3 × 200 = 600

So 600 people eat less than five portions of fruit and vegetables each day.

Use the example above to help you with the following activity. Remember to check your answers once you have completed the questions.

Activity 10: Paying in instalments

Described image
Figure 14 How much would a car cost?

Paul has recently qualified as a midwife and is going to be working out in the community. He needs his own car to travel to visit all of his patients.

Paul signs up to a 4-year PCP deal to purchase a car for £12,000. He needs to pay the money in stages:

  1. one divided by five of the money to be paid as an initial deposit.
  2. two divided by three of the money is to be paid over 4 years.
  3. The remainder is to be paid at the end of the 4-year contract.

How much money will Paul need to pay at the end of the 4-year contract?

Answer

First you need to work out the initial deposit that Paul pays. So to work out one divided by five of £12,000 you need to divide £12,000 by 5.

  • 12,000 ÷ 5 = 2,400

So the deposit Paul has to pay is £2,400.

Then you need to work out two divided by three of the £12,000 Paul needs to pay over the 4 years. Start by working out one divided by three of £12,000. To do this you need to divide £12,000 by 3.

  • 12,000 ÷ 3 = 4,000

So two divided by three of £12,000 is:

  • 4,000 × 2 = 8,000

So Paul will pay £8,000 over the 4 years.

Subtract these two amounts from the total cost to see how much Paul will have left to pay at the end of the contract.

  • 12,000 – 2,400 – 8,000 = 1,600

Paul will need to pay £1,600 at the end of the 4-year contract.

Summary

In this section you have learned how to:

  • find equivalencies in fractions
  • order and compare fractions
  • find the fraction of an amount.

The skills listed above can be used when you are shopping and trying to get the best deal, or when you are splitting a cake or a pizza, say, into equal parts for a birthday celebration at a children’s care home.

It’s important to be able to compare fractions, decimals and percentages in real-life situations. You’ll be looking at percentages later, but first you can look at decimals.

FSM_SSH_1

Take your learning further

Making the decision to study can be a big step, which is why you'll want a trusted University. The Open University has 50 years’ experience delivering flexible learning and 170,000 students are studying with us right now. Take a look at all Open University courses.

If you are new to University-level study, we offer two introductory routes to our qualifications. You could either choose to start with an Access module, or a module which allows you to count your previous learning towards an Open University qualification. Read our guide on Where to take your learning next for more information.

Not ready for formal University study? Then browse over 1000 free courses on OpenLearn and sign up to our newsletter to hear about new free courses as they are released.

Every year, thousands of students decide to study with The Open University. With over 120 qualifications, we’ve got the right course for you.

Request an Open University prospectus371