Women in Science: Track 1

Featuring: Audio Audio

How have individual female scientists contributed to the advancement of science through time? To celebrate the 100th anniversary of International Women’s Day (March 8th) and to mark International Year of Chemistry 2011, The Open University asked some of the female scientists currently working in its Faculty of Science, to nominate their personal choice of outstanding woman of science. The female scientists nominated include several Nobel Prize Laureates, such as Marie Curie, Dorothy Hodgkin and American geneticist, Barbara McClintock. The academics also talk about their own experiences of being a woman in the sciences today.

By: The iTunes U team (Programme and web teams)

  • Duration 50 mins
  • Updated Tuesday 8th March 2011
  • Introductory level
  • Posted under Across the Sciences
Share on Google Plus Share on LinkedIn View article Comments
Print

Track 1: Marie Curie

Dr Liz Parvin, Senior Lecturer in Medical Physics at The Open University, nominates double Nobel Laureate Marie Curie, as her outstanding female scientist.


© The Open University 2011


Tracks in this podcast:

Track   Title Description
1 Marie Curie    Dr Liz Parvin, Senior Lecturer in Medical Physics at The Open University, nominates double Nobel Laureate Marie Curie, as her outstanding female scientist. Play now Marie Curie
2 Mary Anning    Open University PHD student Lucy Greenwood talks about Mary Anning, who collected some of the most significant fossils ever found. Play now Mary Anning
3 Rosalind Franklin    Professor of Planetary and Space Sciences at The Open University, Monica Grady, celebrates the work of British chemist Rosalind Franklin. Play now Rosalind Franklin
4 Gertrude Elles    Senior Lecturer in Earth Sciences at The Open University, Dr Sandy Smith nominates geologist, Gertrude Elles. Play now Gertrude Elles
5 Dorothy Hodgkin    Post-Doctoral Researcher, Clare Warren, nominates Dorothy Hodgkin - the first British woman to win a Nobel Prize. Play now Dorothy Hodgkin
6 Barbara McClintock    American geneticist Barbara McClintock won a Nobel for her pioneering work on genetic transposition. Chosen by Dr Hilary MacQueen, Head of the Department of Life Sciences at The Open University. Play now Barbara McClintock
7 Women in Science Today    All the speakers work at The Open University’s Faculty of Science. Here, they talk about their own experiences of being a woman in science today. Play now Women in Science Today

Copyright information

Tags, Ratings and Social Bookmarking

Ratings

Your rating None. Average rating 5 out of 5, based on 1 rating

Share

Leave a comment
Sign in or create your OpenLearn account to join the discussion.

We invite you to discuss this subject, but remember this is a public forum.
Please be polite, and avoid your passions turning into contempt for others. We may delete posts that are rude or aggressive; or edit posts containing contact details or links to other websites.

Other content you may like

Yes, we still need International Women's Day Creative commons image Icon Dying Regime under Creative Commons BY 4.0 license video icon

Society, Politics & Law 

Yes, we still need International Women's Day

The belief that somehow International Women's Day is marching down the paths of long-secured victories is misplaced, say Rose Capdevila and Lisa Lazard

Video
5 mins
What makes near-future Sci-Fi especially scary? Creative commons image Icon Mark Hill under Creative Commons BY-ND 4.0 license video icon

History & The Arts 

What makes near-future Sci-Fi especially scary?

Science fiction set in the near-now can unsettle more than tales from the year 2525. Why is that?

Video
10 mins
Rio 2016: A Caster Semenya reading list Creative commons image Icon Citizen59 under Creative Commons BY-SA 4.0 license video icon

Health, Sports & Psychology 

Rio 2016: A Caster Semenya reading list

Caster Semenya's 800 metres victory at Rio hasn't been met with universal acclaim, as it reopens the debate over hyperadrogenic atheletes.

Video
10 mins
Science and society: A career and professional development course Copyrighted image Icon Copyright: Used with permission free course icon Level 1 icon

Education & Development 

Science and society: A career and professional development course

Scientists throughout the world are increasingly interested in the relationship between science and society. Part of their concern is with the social responsibilities scientists have in relation to broader public interests. That raises important issues to do with the ethical and social dimension of scientists' work and how scientists explain and perhaps justify their work to the wider public. Science and society: A career and professional development course, is a free course that explores this further.

Free course
30 hrs
How can Wikipedia Activism restore diversity to science? Creative commons image Icon James Kegley - Howard Hughes Medical Institute under Creative Commons BY-SA 4.0 license activity icon

Science, Maths & Technology 

How can Wikipedia Activism restore diversity to science?

Using Wikipedia to celebrate the achievements of the many scientists who aren't white men can help restore a sense of balance to science, says Hilda Bastian.

Activity
OpenLearn Live: 7th August 2015 Creative commons image Icon Kirsten Lara Getchell under CC-BY-SA licence under Creative-Commons license article icon

TV, Radio & Events 

OpenLearn Live: 7th August 2015

Rounding off our week of scientific musicians, and tracking free learning across the day.

Article
Health science and light - International Year of Light Copyrighted image Icon Copyright: Abidal | Dreamstime.com article icon

Health, Sports & Psychology 

Health science and light - International Year of Light

Free learning resources in health science, relating to light, as part of The Open University's International Year of Light celebrations.

Article
International Women's Day 2015 article icon

TV, Radio & Events 

International Women's Day 2015

International Women's Day 2015 - Sunday 8th March 

Article
OU on the BBC: BBC Inside Science - Women in science and open access journals Copyrighted image Icon Copyright: The Open University article icon

TV, Radio & Events 

OU on the BBC: BBC Inside Science - Women in science and open access journals

Do women have to contend with gender bias in the world of science awards? This is discussed and more in this week's BBC Inside Science.

Article