Systems engineering: Challenging complexity
Systems engineering: Challenging complexity

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Systems engineering: Challenging complexity

Acknowledgements

The following material is Proprietary and is used under licence:

Course image: The Cookiemonster [Tip: hold Ctrl and click a link to open it in a new tab. (Hide tip)] in Flickr made available under Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 2.0 Licence.

Various pages: Arup, O., material accessed in January 2002 and December 2000, from.

Box 1: Inman, P. ‘Chaotic scheme that left families relying on food parcels’, The Guardian, 6 July 2005. © Guardian News and Media Ltd 2005.

Box 2: ‘Fly-away drones put robot air force plans off course’, The Sunday Times, 22 June 2003. News Syndication International. Graphic by Julian Osbaldstone and Ian Moores.

Box 3: Ormerod, P. (1998) Butterfly Economics: A New General Theory of Social and Economic Behaviour, Faber and Faber.

Box 5: The Universe of Engineering: A UK Perspective, June 2000, The Royal Academy of Engineering. © Sir Robert Malpas.

Box 9: Dorfman, M. and Thayer, R.H. (1997) Software Engineering, IEEE Computer Society Press. © Copyright 1997 by The Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Inc. All rights reserved.

Box 10: Lake, J.G. (1996) ‘Unravelling the systems engineering lexicon’. Paper presented at the 1996 International Committee for Systems Engineering Symposium.

Fire Department Deployment Analysis – Modelling in Public Policy

Based on Walker et al. (eds) Fire Department Deployment Analysis: A Public Policy Analysis Case Study. The Rand Fire Project, Elsevier North Holland Inc. The Rand Corporation.

The Roskill Commission – Using Cost–Benefit Analysis for Public Policy

Hall, P. (1980) ‘London’s Third Airport’, Great Planning Disasters, Penguin Books Ltd.

Figure 1: Courtesy of Autodesk, Farnborough.

Figures 2, 40, 41 and 43: Dorfman, M. and Thayer, R. H. (1997) Software Engineering, IEEE Computer Society Press. © Copyright 1997 by The Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Inc. All rights reserved.

Figure 17a, clockwise from top left:

© Mary Evans Picture Library,

© National Motor Museum, Beaulieu,

© National Motor Museum, Beaulieu,

© Ford Motor Company

© Mehau Kulyk/Science Photo Library,

© National Motor Museum, Beaulieu.

Figure 17b, clockwise from top left:

© Mary Evans Picture Library, courtesy of Christie‘s South Kensington,

© Mary Evans Picture Library,

© Françoise Sauze/Science Photo Library,

© courtesy of MP3-Plus Net,

© courtesy of Sharp Electronics (UK),

© P M Northwood,

© P M Northwood.

Figure 19: The Universe of Engineering: A UK Perspective, June 2000, The Royal Academy of Engineering. © Sir Robert Malpas.

Figure 20: Pugh, S. (1991) Total Design Integrated Methods for Successful Product Engineering, Addison-Wesley Publishing Company. Reprinted with permission from Pearson Education Ltd.

Figure 26: René Magritte, ‘Ceci n’est pas une pipe’, poster for a shop window, 1952, © DACS.

Figure 41: Eisner, H. (1988), Computeraided Systems Engineering, Prentice Hall.

Figure 42: Sage, A.P. and Rouse, W.B. (1999), Handbook of Systems Engineering and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

Figure 48: Shenhar, A. J. ‘Systems engineering management: the multidisciplinary discipline’, in Sage, A.P. and Rouse, W.B. (1999) Handbook of Systems Engineering and Management, John Wiley & Sons Inc.

Figure 50: INCOSE 1997 A Systems Engineering Partially Annotated Bibliography and Resources List, International Council on Systems Engineering.

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