Introduction to forensic engineering
Introduction to forensic engineering

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Introduction to forensic engineering

Acknowledgements

The content acknowledged below is Proprietary (see terms and conditions) and is used under licence.

Grateful acknowledgement is made to the following sources for permission to reproduce material in this unit:

Figures 7, 8 and 10: Kane, V. E. (1989), Defect prevention: use of simple statistical tools, © 1989 Marcel Dekker, Inc. All Rights Reserved; Figures 40 and 71: Neuber, H. (1958), Kerbspannun gslehre, 2nd edn., Springer, Berlin. Translation, Theory of Notch Stresses, Office of Technical Services, Dept. of Commerce, Wash. D.C. 1961; Figure 61: © Open University/British Ladder Manufacturing Association; Figure 63: Courtesy of Jaguar Cars Limited; Figure 74: ‘Safety data for sodium hydroxide’ The Physical and Theoretical Chemistry Laboratory, Oxford University; Figure 76: Inglis, C.E., (1913) ‘Stresses in a Plate Due to the Presence of Cracks and Sharp Corners’ and Kolosoff, G., (1910), Dissertation, St. Petersburg; Figure 90: Schnell Publishing Company (1991), ‘Plastic Pipe is Expensive for Industry’, Chemical Marketing Reporter, 18 March 1991, © 1991 Schnell Publishing Company; Figure 95: Telegraph Group Ltd. (1997) ‘Fiat recall mirafioris for check’, Daily Telegraph, 12 July 1997 © 1997 Telegraph Group Ltd., Courtesy of Telegraph Group Ltd; Figure 96: The Irish Times (1994), ‘Court asked to strike out Fiatfirms' defence in car fire case’, The Irish Times, 12 October 1994, © 1994 The Irish Times, Courtesy of The Irish Times; Figure 100: Donald, A.M. and Kitching S. (1998), ‘Beam damage of polypropylene in the environmental scanning electron microscope: and FTIR study’, Journal of Microscopy, vol. 190, Pt.3, June 1998, Blackwell Science Ltd, © 1998 The Royal Microscopical Society.

Resource E: All photographs reproduced with the permission of the copyright holder, Peter Lewis

Paper 1 (pp. 4–24): A. Finlay, and P.R. Lewis (1990), ‘Total quality manufacture of stationery products with GMEA methods’, Seminar Proceedings vol. 2, London (1992)

Paper 2 (pp. 26–48): ‘The Open University thanks the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) for permission to use the following material. All extracts are copyright © IEC, Geneva, Switzerland. All rights reserved. Further information on the IEC, its publications and its role is available from www.iec.ch. IEC takes no responsibility for and will not assume liability for damages resulting from the reader’s misinterpretation of the referenced material due to its placement and context in this publication. The material is reproduced or rewritten with their permission’

Paper 3 (pp. 50–64): This article was published in Engineering Failure Analysis, vol. 6 (1999), Lewis, P.R., ‘Premature fracture of a composite nylon radiator’, 1999, © Pergamon Press, 1999. With permission from Elsevier Science

Paper 4 (pp. 66–83): This article was published in Engineering Failure Analysis, vol. 6 (1999), Lewis, P.R. and Wiedmann, G.W., ‘Catastrophic failure of a polypropylene tank Part I: primary investigation’, 1999, © Pergamon Press, 1999. With permission from Elsevier Science

Paper 5 (pp. 86–103): This article was published in Engineering Failure Analysis, vol. 6 (1999), Lewis, P.R. and Wiedmann, G.W., ‘Catastrophic failure of a polypropylene tank Part II: comparison of the DVS 2205 code of practice and the design of the failed tank’, 1999, © Pergamon Press, 1999. With permission from Elsevier Science

Paper 6 (pp. 106–110): © Peter Lewis; pp. 106–107: Lewis, P.R. (1999) ‘Degradation of an acetal plumbing fitting by chlorine’, © 1999 ANTEC/Peter Lewis.

All other materials included in this unit are derived from content originated at the Open University.

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