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Manupedia

Grid List Results: 17 items
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Ultrasonic machining (USM) article icon

Science, Maths & Technology 

Ultrasonic machining (USM)

The workpiece is held in a tank of slurry containing abrasive particles, the slurry is injected into the space between a vibrating tool and stationary workpiece. Material is abraded away until a mirror image of the tool is cut into the workpiece.

Article
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Abrasive jet cutting article icon

Science, Maths & Technology 

Abrasive jet cutting

A high pressure, high velocity jet of water (or air), mixed with dry abrasive particles to form a slurry, is forced through a nozzle in the cutting head. The jet impinges on the surface of the workpiece, eroding away material.

Article
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Water jet cutting (Hydrodynamic cutting) article icon

Science, Maths & Technology 

Water jet cutting (Hydrodynamic cutting)

High velocity, high pressure water jets (or a mixture of water and an abrasive) are used to cut into the surface of the workpiece. Used mainly on non-metallic thin sheet material.

Article
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Creep feed grinding article icon

Science, Maths & Technology 

Creep feed grinding

Effectively a milling process, as high volumes of material can be removed, producing deeper cuts, in a single pass of the grinding wheel. Final surface finishing of the workpiece is provided during a second pass of the grinding wheel, which has by then been dressed by a small diamond roller. Chips of workpiece material are washed away by a jet of coolant aimed into the nip (the nip is the tangential void formed where the curve of the grinding wheel meets the surface of the workpiece; it helps to focus the jet). When the grinding wheel reaches the end of the workpiece, and there is no longer a flat surface to make contact, the nip is lost, so a dummy workpiece is often used to replace the missing flat surface, until the grinding process is complete.

Article
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Centreless grinding article icon

Science, Maths & Technology 

Centreless grinding

Differs from the conventional grinding process in that the workpiece is held between two grinding wheels, rotating in the same direction at different speeds, and a work rest platform. The speed of the grinding wheels rotation relative to each other determines the rate at which material is removed.

Article
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Grinding article icon

Science, Maths & Technology 

Grinding

A mechanical process using a rotating grinding wheel made from abrasive material containing small particles of grit ranging from fine to coarse. The wheel revolves around a central axis, making contact with the surface of the workpiece, while the particles act as cutting tools that cut chips from the material.

Article
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Multipoint cutting (rotational) article icon

Science, Maths & Technology 

Multipoint cutting (rotational)

A mechanical machining process, where a tool with more than one sharp cutting edge rotates on a horizontal or vertical axis, to remove material from the workpiece.

Article
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Multipoint cutting (translational) article icon

Science, Maths & Technology 

Multipoint cutting (translational)

A mechanical machining process, where a tool with more than one sharp cutting edge (‘teeth’) moves horizontally or vertically to remove material from the workpiece.

Article
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Single point cutting article icon

Science, Maths & Technology 

Single point cutting

A mechanical machining process where a tool with a single sharp cutting edge is used to remove material from the workpiece.

Article
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Flame cutting article icon

Science, Maths & Technology 

Flame cutting

A stream of high purity oxygen is directed onto a small pre-heated area on the surface of the workpiece, igniting the metal and oxidising it, removing material and creating the kerf.

Article
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Plasma arc cutting article icon

Science, Maths & Technology 

Plasma arc cutting

An electrical arc is formed between the plasma torch (-ve) and the workpiece (+ve). Plasma passes through a constricting fine bore nozzle, creating a high velocity, high-temperature jet of plasma that transfers the arc to the workpiece, melting away material to form the kerf.

Article
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Laser cutting article icon

Science, Maths & Technology 

Laser cutting

Mainly used for precision cutting of materials with a low melting point. A finely focused laser beam locally heats the surface of the workpiece, vaporising and melting away material. Residue material is removed by induced vapor pressure, or by gas jets (gas-assisted laser cutting).

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