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Manupedia

Grid List Results: 14 items
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Magneform (electromagnetic assembly and forming) article icon

Science, Maths & Technology 

Magneform (electromagnetic assembly and forming)

A high energy rate, cold forming technique that reshapes metals without physical contact. When an electric current generates pulsed opposing magnetic fields near the metal, a controllable pressure is created.

Article
Copyrighted  image Icon Copyright: The Open University
Injected metal assembly (Liquid riveting) article icon

Science, Maths & Technology 

Injected metal assembly (Liquid riveting)

This refinement of die casting is a simple joining/assembly technique where components are accurately positioned and metal is injected into the cavity between the components and a die, solidifying almost instantaneously. The join, which may be stronger than the component itself, depends on the mechanical locking action and shrinkage of the injected metal, not adhesion.

Article
Copyrighted  image Icon Copyright: The Open University
Fasteners article icon

Science, Maths & Technology 

Fasteners

Mechanical joining using hardware devices to fasten two or more parts together, e.g. nuts and bolts, screws, rivets or mechanical interlocks.

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Diffusion bonding (SPF/DB or form bonding) article icon

Science, Maths & Technology 

Diffusion bonding (SPF/DB or form bonding)

A solid state welding process where two surfaces are bonded together, over time, using heat and pressure, usually under vacuum or inert gas to avoid contamination. Used for metals that are hard to weld by conventional fusion welding. Filler metal is not needed, because atoms from each surface diffuse into each other to create the bond.

Article
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Adhesive bonding article icon

Science, Maths & Technology 

Adhesive bonding

Adhesive bonding uses an adhesive material, or glue, to join a wide range of dissimilar materials. The glue does not generally react with the materials being bonded.

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Soldering article icon

Science, Maths & Technology 

Soldering

The workpiece material is not melted as in welding, but metal parts are joined using filler metals that have a melting point below 300°C. The molten filler metal is drawn into the weld gap by capillary attraction, eventually solidifying to form the bond. There are various ways to apply the heat.

Article
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Brazing article icon

Science, Maths & Technology 

Brazing

The workpiece material is not melted as in welding, but metal parts are joined using filler metals that have a melting point above 450°C, but below the melting point of the materials being joined. The molten filler metal is drawn into the weld gap by capillary attraction across the joint, eventually solidifying to form the bond. There are various ways to apply the heat.

Article
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Plasma arc welding article icon

Science, Maths & Technology 

Plasma arc welding

Welding is initiated by an electric arc transferred from a torch body to the workpiece, via a high temperature, high velocity plasma jet forced through a constricting nozzle. Hence, delivering a high concentration of heat to a very small area, to melt the weld material and fuse the weld joint.

Article
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Electro-slag welding article icon

Science, Maths & Technology 

Electro-slag welding

Heat is generated by an electric current, via flux covered electrode wire, which passes through conductive liquid slag sitting in the weld gap. Melted material from the workpiece amalgamates with molten flux, to form the weld joint.

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Gas shielded arc welding processes (TIG/MIG/MAG) article icon

Science, Maths & Technology 

Gas shielded arc welding processes (TIG/MIG/MAG)

Welding is initiated by an electric arc between a tungsten electrode and the metal to be joined. The arc melts the metal, whilst shrouding it in a cloud of argon, helium gas or carbon dioxide, to shield the weld from contaminants in the atmosphere. Extra filler metal can be added by using a separate filler rod.

Article
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Manual metal arc welding (MMA) article icon

Science, Maths & Technology 

Manual metal arc welding (MMA)

Welding is initiated by striking an electric arc between a flux coated electrode and the metal workpiece to be joined. A combination of melted base metal, and molten core wire from the electrode, forms the welded joint. Welding materials are shielded from contaminants in the atmosphere by gases produced from the flux coating. 

Article
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Laser beam welding article icon

Science, Maths & Technology 

Laser beam welding

Heat is generated by a concentrated, high energy laser beam directed at the joint to be welded. The surfaces of the workpiece melt, bonding the two parts together. Results in a narrow weld zone and HAZ. Combining laser and gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding can produce deeper weld penetration.

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