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Introduction to finite element analysis
Introduction to finite element analysis

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Step 4 – Modelling issues and assumptions

For both the boundary condition restraints and load input points we can expect some localised high stresses. We’re not interested in these though. As long as the loads and reaction forces are fed into the structure, the main part - the bit we’re interested in - will be modelled and behave close to the real thing.

For this component Steps 1, 2 and 3 are relatively easy, even easier than for the wheel hub.

Considering modelling issues and assumptions, the tub is large, of a complex shape, and made of a material which is clearly not isotropic. It is ‘orthotropic’.

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If you compare the chassis tub to the hub, material behaviour is probably the most different aspect. The hub is made of steel, a linear, elastic, homogenous and isotropic material, and can be described using only a couple of numbers.

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