A tour of the cell
A tour of the cell

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A tour of the cell

Acknowledgements

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see terms and conditions [Tip: hold Ctrl and click a link to open it in a new tab. (Hide tip)] ), this content is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Licence.

Course image: Umberto Salvagnin in Flickr made available under Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence.

The material acknowledged below is Proprietary, used under licence and not subject to Creative Commons licence. See terms and conditions. Grateful acknowledgement is made to the following:

Figures

Figure 2b: Dr Gopal Murti/Science Photo Library;

Figure 3: Courtesy of Heather Davies, Department of Life, Health and Chemical Sciences, Open University;

Figure 10: Dr Torsten Wittmann/Science Photo Library;

Figure 11a, 17a, 19a and 22a: Courtesy of Professor Michael Stewart, Department of Life, Health and Chemical Sciences, Open University;

Figure 12: Adapted from Purves, W.K. et al. (1998) Life, the Science of Biology, 5th edn, Sinauer Associates Inc;

Figure 14: Dr Richard Kessel and Dr Gene Shih, Visuals Unlimited/Science Photo Library;

Figure 16: Photo printed with permission from O. L. Miller, B. A. Hamkalo and C. A. Thomas Jr;

Figure 21a: CNRI/ Science Photo Library;

Figure 21b: Dr Don Fawcett/Science Photo Library;

Figure 22c: Dr Gopal Murti/Science Photo Library;

Figure 24: Courtesy of Jill Saffrey, Department of Life, Health and Chemical Sciences, Open University.

Activity 1 A tour of the cell

Animal cell

Animal cell 1 of 3. © Dr H. Jastrow.

Animal cell 2 of 3. © Dr H. Jastrow.

Animal cell 3 of 3. © Dr H. Jastrow.

Cell membrane 1 of 3: Don W. Fawcett, used under a Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial, No Derivatives licence.

Cell membrane 2 of 3: George E. Palade, used under a Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial, Share Alike licence.

Cell membrane 3 of 3: © Dr H. Jastrow.

Centrosome: Image generously made available by William Brinkley (Baylor). Original resource provided by Keith R. Porter Archives (University of Maryland Baltimore County, Baltimore, MD). This image was created by Manley McGill in 1976 while he was a member of the laboratory of William Brinkley at The University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston. Dr Brinkley (currently at Baylor College of Medicine) has dedicated this publication to the memory of his former student.

Cytoskeleton 1 of 4: © Dr H. Jastrow.

Cytoskeleton 2 of 4: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, National Institute of General Medical Sciences Image Gallery.

Cytoskeleton 3 of 4: Feldman, M. E., Apsel, B., Uotila, A., Loewith, R., Knight, Z.A. et al. (2009) Active-Site Inhibitors of mTOR Target Rapamycin-Resistant Outputs of mTORC1 and mTORC2. PLoS Biol 7(2): e1000038. doi:10.1371/journal.pbio.1000038. Used under a Creative Commons Attribution Licence.

Cytoskeleton 4 of 4: Patricia Wadsworth, 2007 Olympus BioScapes Digital Imaging Competition. Used under a Creative Commons, Attribution Non-Commercial; No Derivatives Licence.

Golgi apparatus: Mary Morphew, J. Richard McIntosh, Mark Ladinsky.

Lysosomes: © Dr H. Jastrow.

Mitochondria: Keith Porter, used under a Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial, No Derivatives licence.

Nucleolus: © Dr H. Jastrow.

Nucleus 1 of 2: © Dr H. Jastrow.

Nucleus 2 of 2: Hans Ris

Peroxisomes: © Dr H. Jastrow.

Ribosomes: George E. Palade, used under a Creative Commons Attribution, Non-Commercial Share Alike licence.

Rough ER: George E. Palade, used under a Creative Commons Attribution, Non-Commercial Share Alike licence.

Smooth ER: © Dr H. Jastrow.

Plant cell

Plant cell: University of Wisconsin Plant Teaching Collection.

Cell-membrane: University of Wisconsin Plant Teaching Collection.

Cell wall: University of Wisconsin Plant Teaching Collection.

Chloroplasts 1 of 2: University of Wisconsin Plant Teaching Collection.

Chloroplasts 2 of 2: University of Wisconsin Plant Teaching Collection.

Plasmodesmata 1 of 2: University of Wisconsin Plant Teaching Collection.

Plasmodesmata 2 of 2: University of Wisconsin Plant Teaching Collection.

Golgi apparatus: University of Wisconsin Plant Teaching Collection.

Mitochondria: University of Wisconsin Plant Teaching Collection.

Nucleus 1 of 2: University of Wisconsin Plant Teaching Collection.

Nucleus 2 of 2: University of Wisconsin Plant Teaching Collection.

Nucleolus: University of Wisconsin Plant Teaching Collection.

Peroxisomes: University of Wisconsin Plant Teaching Collection.

Ribosomes: University of Wisconsin Plant Teaching Collection.

Endoplasmic reticulum: University of Wisconsin Plant Teaching Collection.

Vacuole: Dr Jeremy Burgess/Science Photo Library.

Cell types

Plasma cell: © Dr H. Jastrow.

Neuron: © Dr H. Jastrow.

Chondroblast: © Dr H. Jastrow.

Pituitary cell: © Dr H. Jastrow.

Mouse skeletal muscle: Hanna Osinska.

Columnar epithelial cell: © Dr H. Jastrow.

Capillary: © Dr H. Jastrow.

Schwann cell and nerve axon: © Dr H. Jastrow.

White fat cell. © Dr H. Jastrow.

Neutrophil: © Dr H. Jastrow.

Hepatocyte: © Dr H. Jastrow.

Every effort has been made to contact copyright holders. If any have been inadvertently overlooked the publishers will be pleased to make the necessary arrangements at the first opportunity.

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