Introducing international development management
Introducing international development management

Start this free course now. Just create an account and sign in. Enrol and complete the course for a free statement of participation or digital badge if available.

Free course

Introducing international development management

References

Section 1
Brett, T. (2000) ‘Understanding organizations and institutions’, in Robinson, D., Hewitt, T. and Harriss, T. (eds.) Managing Development: Understanding Inter-organizational Relationships, London, Sage Publications in association with the Open University.
Thomas, A. (1996) ‘What is development management?’ Journal of International Development, vol. 8, no. 1, pp. 95–110.
World Vision International (2006) website online at www.worldvision.org.uk (accessed 21 May 2008).
Section 2
Daily News Sri Lanka (2001) ‘Kenya's Tea Industry Threatened’, 4 September.
Dinham, B. and Hines, C. (1983) Agribusiness in Africa, Earth Resources Research Publications, London.
The Financial Gazette: Southern Africa (2000) ‘Kenya Postpones Tea Body Privatization’, 6 January.
McGrew, A. (2000) ‘Sustainable globalisation? The global politics of development and exclusion in the new world order’ in Allen, T. and Thomas, A. (eds) Poverty and Development into the 21st Century, Oxford, Oxford University Press and the Open University, pp. 3–22.
NewsAfrica (2001) Successful Small-Scale Tea Farming in Kenya, http://www.newafrica.com
Nyangito, H. and Kimura, J. (1999) ‘Liberalization of the Smallholder Tea Sub-sector: progress, Impacts and Recommendationsfor Further Development’ in Institute of Policy Analysis and Research (IPAR) Policy Brief, no. 1, pp. 1–5.
Spoor, M.(1998) ‘The Aral Sea Basin Crisis: Transition and Environment in Former Soviet Central Asia’ in Development and Change,vol. 29, no. 3, pp. 409–435.
Swainson, N. (1980) Development of Corporate Capitalism in Kenya, Heinemann Educational Books Ltd, London.
Thomas, A. and Allen, T. (2000) ‘Agencies of development’ in Allen, T. and Thomas, A. (eds) Poverty and Development into the 21st Century, Oxford, Oxford University Press and the Open University, pp. 189–218.
Thomas, A. (2000) ‘Poverty and the “end of development”’ in Allen, T. and Thomas, A. (eds) Poverty and Development into the 21st Century, Oxford, Oxford University Press and the Open University, pp. 345–364.
Woodhouse, P. (2000) ‘Environmental degradation and sustainability’ in Allen, T. and Thomas, A. (eds) Poverty and Development into the 21st Century, Oxford, Oxford University Press and the Open University, pp. 141–162.
World Bank (2003) World Development Report 2003: Sustainable Development in a Dynamic World, Washington D.C., World Bank.
Section 3
Ayele, S. (2006) ‘IRMA: A case study of a science and technology-based intervention to reduce hunger’. Case study prepared for TU870 in Case Studies.
Chambers, R. (1983) Rural Development: Putting the Last First, Harlow, Longman.
Chambers, R. (1997) Whose Reality Counts? Putting the First Last, London, Intermediate Technology Publications.
Chapman, J. (2002) ‘Monitoring and evaluating advocacy’, PLA Notes (International Institute for Environment and Development), Vol. 43, pp. 48–52.
Coates, B. and David, R. (2002) ‘Learning for change: the art of assessing the impact of advocacy work’, Development in Practice, vol. 12, no. 3 and 4, pp. 530–41.
Cornwall, A. (2002) ‘Making spaces, changing places: Situating participation in development’, IDS Working Paper 170, Brighton, IDS, October, pp. 1–6, 10–17, 26–29.
le Mare, A. (2006) ‘Belfast travellers: a case study of the provision of housing and services for the travelling community in Belfast’. Case study prepared for TU870 in Case Studies.
Hanlon, J. (2007) ‘Grabbing attention’, in Thomas, A. and Mohan, G. (eds), Research Skills for Policy and Development, London, SAGE Publications, pp. 72–92.
Mackintosh, M. (1992) ‘Introduction’, in Wuyts, M., Mackintosh, M. and Hewitt, T. (eds) Development Policy and Public Action, Oxford, Oxford University Press in association with The Open University.
Mayer , S. (2007) ‘Using evidence in advocacy’, in Thomas, A. and Mohan, G. (eds), Research Skills for Policy and Development, London, SAGE Publications, pp. 254–74.
Tearfund (2002) Advocacy toolkit: Understanding advocacy, online at tilz.tearfund.org (accessed 28 April 2008).
Thomas, A. (2007) ‘Introduction’, in Thomas, A. and Mohan, G. (eds), Research Skills for Policy and Development, London, SAGE Publications, pp. 1–22.
Thomas, A. (1996) ‘What is development management?’ Journal of International Development, vol. 8, no. 1, pp. 95–110.
World Vision International (2006) website online at www.worldvision.org.uk (accessed 21 May 2008).
Section 4
Barakat, S. and M. Chard (2002) ‘Theories, rhetoric and practice: recovering the capacities of war-torn societies’, Third World Quarterly, vol. 23, no. 5. pp. 817–835.
Bebbington, A. and Riddell, R. (1997) ‘Heavy hands, hidden hands, holding hands? Donors, intermediary NGOs and civil society organizations’, in Hulme, D. and Edwards, M. (eds.) NGOs, States and Donors. Too Close for Comfort?, London, Macmillan in association with Save the Children.
Brett, T. (2000) ‘Understanding organizations and institutions’, in Managing Development, Chapter 2 in Robinson, D., Hewitt, T. and Harriss, T. (eds.) Managing Development: Understanding Inter-organizational Relationships, London, Sage Publications in association with the Open University.
Cleaver, F. (2001) ‘Institutions, Agency and the Limitations of Participatory Approaches to Development’, in Cooke, B. and Kothari, U. (eds.) Participation: the New Tyranny? London, Zed Press.
Crewe, E. and Harrison, E. (1998) Whose Development? An Ethnography of Aid, London, Zed Books.
Doriye, J. (1992) ‘Public office and private gain: an interpretation of the Tanzanian experience’, in Wuyts, M., Mackintosh, M. and Hewitt, T. (eds.) Development Policy and Public Action, Oxford, Oxford University Press in association with The Open University.
Fisher, R. and Urry, W. (1996) Getting to YES, London, London Business Books Ltd.
Freire, P. (1972) Pedagogy of the Oppressed, Harmondsworth, Penguin, pp. 135–150.
Howell, J. and Pearce, J. (2001) Civil Society and Development, London, Lynne Rienner Publishers.
Knight, J. (1992) Institutions and Social Conflict, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press.
Long, N. (2004) ‘Contesting policy ideas from below’, in Bøås, M., and McNeill, D. (eds.) Global Institutions and Development, London, Routledge
Mackintosh, M. (1992b) ‘Questioning the state’ in Wuyts, M., Mackintosh, M. and Hewitt, T. (eds) Development Policy and Public Action, Oxford, Oxford University Press in association with The Open University.
Morgan, G. (1997) ‘Appendix A: The theory behind the practice’ (extract), in Imaginization: The Art of Creative Management, London, Sage, pp. 272–294
North, D. (1990) Institutions, Institutional Change and Economic Performance, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press.
Rahnema, M. (1992) ‘Participation’, in Sachs, W. (ed.) The Development Dictionary. A Guide to Knowledge and Power, London and New Jersey, Zed Books Ltd., pp. 116–131.
Robinson, D., Hewitt, T. and Harriss, J. (2000) ‘Why inter-organisational relationships matter’, in Robinson, D., Hewitt, T. and Harriss, J. (eds) Managing Development, London, SAGE Publications in association with the Open University.
Uphoff, N. (1986) Local Institutional Development: an Analytical Sourcebook, West Hartford, Connecticut, Kumarian Press.
World Bank (1997) World Development Report 1997. The State in a Changing World, New York, Oxford University Press and The World Bank.
World Bank (2001) World Development Report 2002: Building Institutions for Markets, Washington D.C., World Bank.
Section 5
Adair, J. (1999) Decision making and problem solving, London, Institute of Personnel and Development.
Bono, E. de (1992) Lateral thinking for management, Middlesex, Penguin.
Bono, E. de (1996) Edward de Bono's textbook of wisdom, London, Viking, Penguin Group.
Cramer, C. and Goodhand, J. (2002) ‘Try again, fail again, fail better? War, the state, the “post-conflict” challenge in Afghanistan’, Development and Change, 33(5), pp. 885–909.
Dewar, M. (1985) The British army in Northern Ireland, London, Arms and Armour Press.
DfID (UK Department for International Development) (2002) Conducting conflict assessments: guidance notes.
Kuhn, R.L. and Kuhn, L. (1991) ‘Decision making and deal making: how creativity helps’, in J. Henry (ed), Creative Management, London, Sage, in association with the Open University.
McMillan, E. (2004) Complexity, organizations and change, London, Routledge.
Ministry of Defence (MoD) (2002) British army field manual, Part 8, Command 2, Staff procedures, Chapter 5 Decision making, issue 1.4 as amended December 2002.
Ministry of Defence (MoD) (2004) The military contribution to peace support operations, Joint Warfare Publication 3–50, 2nd edn, Shrivenham (UK), The Joint Doctrine & Concepts Centre, Ministry of Defence.
Morgan, G. (1986) Images of organization, Beverly Hills, London, Sage.
Northcraft, G. and Neale, M. (1990) Organization behavior, Chicago, Dryden Press.
Rose, S. (1998) Lifelines, London, Penguin books.
Senge, P. (1992) The fifth discipline, London, Century Business.
Sontag, D. (2004) in The New York Times, 14 July 2004.
Whetten, D.A and Cameron, K.S. (1993) Developing management skills: managing conflict, New York, HarperCollins.
TU870_1

Take your learning further371

Making the decision to study can be a big step, which is why you'll want a trusted University. The Open University has 50 years’ experience delivering flexible learning and 170,000 students are studying with us right now. Take a look at all Open University courses372.

If you are new to university level study, we offer two introductory routes to our qualifications. Find out Where to take your learning next?373 You could either choose to start with an Access courses374or an open box module, which allows you to count your previous learning towards an Open University qualification.

Not ready for University study then browse over 1000 free courses on OpenLearn375 and sign up to our newsletter376 to hear about new free courses as they are released.

Every year, thousands of students decide to study with The Open University. With over 120 qualifications, we’ve got the right course for you.

Request an Open University prospectus371