Starting with law: An overview of the law
Starting with law: An overview of the law

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Starting with law: An overview of the law

9.5 Tables

Using a table or just a set of columns can help you to analyse information and ideas. You can vary the number of columns and rows as needed. The following activity provides an opportunity for you to summarise information in a table.

Activity 7: Completing a table

0 hours 20 minutes

Look back at the classifications of civil and criminal law in this course and complete the table below, which we have also provided in PDF format for you to print out and complete.

Table 1 The differences between civil and criminal law

Civil law Criminal law
What is its purpose?
Who brings the case?
Who is the case against?
Standard of proof required
Possible outcome of the case
Examples

Table 1 The differences between civil and criminal law [Tip: hold Ctrl and click a link to open it in a new tab. (Hide tip)]

Discussion

Here is an example of what a completed table could look like.

Table 1 Completed table illustrating the differences between civil and criminal law

Civil law Criminal law
What is its purpose? To provide a system which enables individuals to resolve disputes. To prevent behaviour which is deemed unacceptable and to preserve order in society.
Who brings the case? A claimant (usually an individual, company or public body). A prosecutor (usually a member of the Crown Prosecution Service).
Who is the case against? A respondent (the person who has done the wrong, for example, caused the car accident). A defendant (the person who, it is alleged, has committed the offence).
Standard of proof required The claimant must prove their case on the balance of probabilities. The prosecutor must prove their case beyond reasonable doubt.
Possible outcome of the case If the claim is successful a remedy will be awarded. This may be in the form of monetary compensation (damages) or alternatives such as an injunction. If convicted, the defendant may be fined, given a community punishment or sent to prison.
Examples Breach of contract, a dispute over a will, a dispute over a broken domestic appliance. Theft, drink driving, murder, fraud.
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