Skip to content

We have tagged as 'apartheid' ?

Tag: apartheid

Grid List Results: 10 items
Copyrighted  image Icon Copyright: BBC
Living Shakespeare: Dr John Kani on South Africa and Othello video icon

History & The Arts 

Living Shakespeare: Dr John Kani on South Africa and Othello

Shakespeare's 'Othello' still makes people uncomfortable because it tackles racism, so what was it like for John Kani who played the play's lead role at the peak of Apartheid in South Africa?

Video
5 mins
Creative commons image Icon Guinnog under CC-BY-SA licence under Creative-Commons license
OpenLearn Live: 15th September 2015 article icon

History & The Arts 

OpenLearn Live: 15th September 2015

From South Africa in 1990, a sign of changing times. How will.i.am is helping with the shortage of engineers. And more free learning across the day.

Article
Creative commons image Icon Petras Gagilas under CC-BY-SA licence under Creative-Commons license
Thinking Allowed: Migration to London and South Africa article icon

TV, Radio & Events 

Thinking Allowed: Migration to London and South Africa

This week's Thinking Allowed features The Open University's Dr Daniel Conway and looks at migration in contrasting contexts

Article
Copyrighted  image Icon Copyright: The Open University 2011
Othello and apartheid video icon

History & The Arts 

Othello and apartheid

Can a play written in the seventeenth century protest against contemporary issues? Is it possible to use a Shakespearian tragedy draw attention to political injustice? Apartheid was a system of enforced legal racial segregation in South Africa that was imposed on the country's majority non white inhabitants by the minority white population. In 1988 actress and director Janet Suzman took the decision to defy the racist apartheid regime by staging Othello in Johannesburg with a mixed cast of both white and black actors. In these three films we explore the way in which one of Shakespeare’s plays was used to make provocative statements on the political situation in South Africa the late eighties. This material forms part of The Open University course A230 Reading and studying literature.

Video
15 mins
Creative commons image Icon RedEyedRex under CC-BY licence under Creative-Commons license
What do children know about politics, and how do they react? article icon

Society, Politics & Law 

What do children know about politics, and how do they react?

Dorothy Moss' research suggests children pick up political stories as part of their every day lives - but it's too glib to assume that their adult allegiances are formed at an early age.

Article
Copyrighted  image Icon Copyright: The Open University 2011
Worlds of English video icon

Languages 

Worlds of English

How has the English language spread internationally - and is the worldwide influence of English a cause for celebration or concern? How is it changing in response to social, cultural, and technological developments? ‘Worlds of English’ investigates these notions by looking at the expansion of English in China since the 1970s, how it is now the dominant language used at the European Parliament and how a local vernacular in Singapore, known as 'Singlish' is causing controversy. It also examines the role of, and attitude towards, English since the end of Apartheid. This material forms part of The Open University course U214 Worlds of English.

Video
1 hr
Copyrighted  image Icon Copyright: The Open University 2008
Keeping Ahead in ICT audio icon

Science, Maths & Technology 

Keeping Ahead in ICT

The legacy of apartheid in South Africa left people in urban townships and rural areas without access to basic communication technology that defines the digital age. Today, the latest mobile phone technology has changed everything. To reach the poorest communities, the government has had to adapt the technology and build new commercial partnerships. The six video tracks in this album introduce the size of the challenge, government policy and initiatives and the businesses that benefit. This material forms part of the course T324, Keeping Ahead in ICT.

Audio
35 mins
Copyrighted  image Icon Copyright: The Open University 2008
Making Social Worlds audio icon

Society, Politics & Law 

Making Social Worlds

How does society create and control our social world? How do passports and passbooks function as agents of government control? And what are the purposes of citizenship tests and ceremonies? This album provides insight into how large communities are organised to regulate their social behaviour. People who lived under Apartheid in South Africa describe how their passbook governed their social world, from alcohol consumption to medical health. Philosophers, politicians and academics offer differing perspectives on requirements for citizenship and the importance of citizenship ceremonies in the UK and Australia. In the two audio tracks, course team members Liz McFall and Sophie Watson put the ideas covered in the album into their academic context. This material is taken from The Open University course DD308 Making social worlds.

Audio
1 hr
Copyrighted  image Icon Copyright: Production team
OU Lecture 2008: The impact of China on development: Listen to/download the lecture audio icon

TV, Radio & Events 

OU Lecture 2008: The impact of China on development: Listen to/download the lecture

The full version of Professor Kaplinsky's 2008 Open University Lecture to download.

Audio
5 mins
Copyrighted  image Icon Copyright: Production team
OU Lecture 2008: The early years audio icon

TV, Radio & Events 

OU Lecture 2008: The early years

In the first segment of his lecture, Professor Raphael Kaplinsky explains how growing up in South Africa helped shape the way he sees the world.

Audio
10 mins