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Top-up Bachelor of Engineering (Honours) free course icon

 

Top-up Bachelor of Engineering (Honours)

Top up your existing qualification to an honours degree. You can top up your OU Foundation Degree in Engineering or an equivalent qualification from somewhere else. Tailor your studies to suit your background and previous study. Develop your knowledge and skills and open up further career or educational opportunities. Study choices include communications, design, electronics, environmental management, mathematics, micro and nano technology, renewable energy, and structural integrity. You'll also complete an engineering project.

OU course
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BSc (Honours) Computing and IT (Communications and Software) free course icon

Science, Maths & Technology 

BSc (Honours) Computing and IT (Communications and Software)

You will need a computer with internet access to study for this qualification. For most OU qualifications a Microsoft Windows (new since 2007), Apple Mac (OS X 10.6 or later) or Linux computer should be adequate. However, some qualifications require more specific IT equipment, in which case you will need additional software to use an Apple Mac or Linux computer. A detailed technical specification for your modules will be made available when you register. Please note, technical specifications do change over time to match computer developments and the way we teach.

OU course
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BSc (Honours) Computing and IT (Communications and Networking) free course icon

Science, Maths & Technology 

BSc (Honours) Computing and IT (Communications and Networking)

You will need a computer with internet access to study for this qualification. For most OU qualifications a Microsoft Windows (new since 2007), Apple Mac (OS X 10.6 or later) or Linux computer should be adequate. However, some qualifications require more specific IT equipment, in which case you will need additional software to use an Apple Mac or Linux computer. A detailed technical specification for your modules will be made available when you register. Please note, technical specifications do change over time to match computer developments and the way we teach.

OU course
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Diploma of Higher Education in Computing & IT and a second subject free course icon

Health, Sports & Psychology 

Diploma of Higher Education in Computing & IT and a second subject

This flexible diploma offers a broad introduction to computing & IT before focusing on computer science, communications and networking, software development or web development. You'll combine this with a second subject, choosing from business, design, mathematics, psychology or statistics ? your choice of second subject will be included in the name of your diploma, for example, Diploma of Higher Education in Computing & IT and Business.

OU course
free course icon Level

Money & Business 

Marketing in action

Whether you are interested in a career in marketing or merely curious about how marketing works, this module provides an opportunity to explore marketing practice in action. The module is built around marketing communications as a fundamental marketing practice and is informed by insights from practitioners. You'll learn how marketing is applied in different contexts, how to keep pace with marketing trends and emerging practices and appreciate the role of marketing research. You'll also examine social and environmental sustainability, enhance your ethical awareness and analysis skills, explore stakeholder marketing and navigate the plethora of marketing evaluation measures.

OU course
free course icon Level

 

Nanoscale engineering

Gain industry-relevant knowledge of nanoscale engineering, including: manufacture of nanoscale structures and devices; functionality of thin film coatings; energy harvesting and storage; biosensors; and nanotechnology use in medical diagnoses and treatments. You'll learn how surfaces and nanomaterials are characterised. And how the performance of nanoscale devices and processes is simulated. Nanotechnology is contributing solutions to previously inaccessible challenges ? in sectors including communications, energy, environment, healthcare, personalised medicine, and security.

OU course
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free course icon Level

 

Electronics: signal processing, control and communications

This module teaches industrially relevant skills in the application of analogue and digital electronics to signal processing, control and communications. Signal processing looks at the ways both analogue and/or digital filters can remove noise from signals. Control shows how using feedback and a suitable controller can change the dynamic behaviour of processes (electronic/mechanical or other) to meet a desired criterion. Communication shows how cables and radio waves can communicate data.

OU course
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Communications technology free course icon Level

 

Communications technology

Electronic communication is ubiquitous in homes, offices and urban environments. You probably regularly use mobile devices, Wi-Fi and broadband. What makes such forms of communication possible? How do they relate to each other? Why is their performance so variable? This module gives you an insight into these and other questions, by looking at the fundamental principles of communications technologies. Through these principles you will gain an insight into the possibilities and constraints of modern communications technology. This module complements other modules relating to networking, human-computer interaction, and pervasive computing.

OU course
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Graphs, networks and design free course icon Level

Science, Maths & Technology 

Graphs, networks and design

This module is about using ideas from discrete mathematics to model problems, and representing these ideas through diagrams. The word 'graphs' refers to diagrams consisting of points joined by lines. These points may correspond to chemical atoms, towns, electrical terminals or anything that can be connected in pairs. The lines may be chemical bonds, roads, wires or other connections. The main topics of mathematical interest are graphs and digraphs; network flows; block designs; geometry; codes; and mathematical modelling. Application areas covered include communications; structures and mechanisms; electrical networks; transport systems; and computer science. To study this module you should have a sound knowledge of relevant mathematics provided by the appropriate OU level 2 study.

OU course
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The Special Adviser’s Tale, or Political Storytelling in the Time of Covid article icon

Languages 

The Special Adviser’s Tale, or Political Storytelling in the Time of Covid

When Dominic Cummings broke the COVID-19 lockdown rules, how did the attempts to 'change the narrative' by Cummings and the government defy the logic of storytelling?

Article
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Marketing communications as a strategic function free course icon Level

Money & Business 

Marketing communications as a strategic function

Marketing communications help to define an organisation's relationship with its customers. This free course, Marketing communications as a strategic function, emphasises the strategic importance of such communication and its long-term effect on consumers. Communication models can act as a predictive guide, but in the end it is important to recognise the autonomy and unpredictability of consumers.

Free course
6 hrs
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Five ways to... use free software article icon

Science, Maths & Technology 

Five ways to... use free software

Is money tight? Save some cash by spending less on your computer: discover five ways to use free software

Article
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