Skip to content

We have tagged as 'evolution' ?

Tag: evolution

Grid List Results: 112 items
Certificate in Astronomy and Planetary Science free course icon

Science, Maths & Technology 

Certificate in Astronomy and Planetary Science

This certificate covers basic astronomy and planetary science. You'll study two broad themes of 'Stars and Galaxies' and 'Multiwavelength Astronomy'. Learn how astronomers 'measure' the Universe ? considering spectroscopy, imaging, and time-variability as observational tools. You'll study the formation, evolution and rebirth of stars and galaxies through energetic processes, and learn about their constituents. Learn about the formation and evolution of the Solar System and other planetary systems. Consider how life arose on Earth, and whether life exists beyond Earth. You'll look at planetary processes such as volcanism and impacts in the Solar System; the structure of planets and their atmospheres; and asteroids, comets and meteorites.

OU course
Copyrighted  image Icon Copyright: The Open University/Karen Parker
Astrophysics free course icon Level

Science, Maths & Technology 

Astrophysics

If you are interested in using quantitative physical methods to understand the building blocks of the Universe, and already have a good background in OU level 2 maths, physics and astronomy, then this is the module for you. This module focuses on the astrophysics of stars and exoplanets ? examining their properties, structure, evolution and the physical processes that occur within them. The OU's Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) and internet-based resources are used throughout the module. You'll experience real, collaborative astrophysical research, online with a small group of other students, to acquire, reduce, analyse and interpret data.

OU course
Copyrighted  image Icon Copyright: Irochka | Dreamstime.com
The relativistic Universe free course icon Level

Science, Maths & Technology 

The relativistic Universe

If you are interested in using quantitative physical methods to understand relativistic and high-energy processes in the Universe, and already have a good background in OU level 2 maths, physics and astronomy, then this is the module for you. This module comprises three parts that present, in turn, the theoretical basis for modern cosmology, described by Einstein's special and general theories of relativity; cosmological observations of the local and distant Universe that are used to understand its structure and evolution; and high-energy phenomena in the Universe including interacting binary stars, active galactic nuclei and gamma-ray bursts.

OU course
Copyrighted  image Icon Copyright: Neil Arnold
Past-Time Lover: Charles Darwin article icon

History & The Arts 

Past-Time Lover: Charles Darwin

This article is part of a collection produced for Valentine’s Day. Who would you select for your Valentine from these iconic figures from history?

Article
Introducing mammals free course icon Level

Nature & Environment 

Introducing mammals

Mammals come in a bewildering variety of shapes and sizes, and yet all species have some characteristics in common. These similarities justify the inclusion of all such diverse types within the single taxonomic group (or class) called the Mammalia. This free course, Introducing mammals, offers a starting point for the study of mammals. It will establish their rich diversity, while highlighting the common features that define the group.  

Free course
5 hrs
Creative commons image Icon By Mouser (Own work) [GFDL or CC-BY-SA-3.0], via Wikimedia Commons under Creative-Commons license
Astronomy free course icon Level

Science, Maths & Technology 

Astronomy

This module considers the structure, origin and evolution of stars, galaxies and the Universe as a whole, asking questions such as: How are stars born, and what happens when they die? How do galaxies form, and how do we know that the universe began in a 'big bang'? This introduction to astronomy investigates the stars and their life cycles, galaxies and quasars, and the origin and evolution of the Universe ? and how it might continue to evolve in the future. You'll make use of computer-based resources and can undertake some straightforward project work, based on your observations of the sky.

OU course
Copyrighted  image Icon Copyright: OU image library
Fossil evidence for evolution article icon

History & The Arts 

Fossil evidence for evolution

Although Darwin was originally disappointed by the evidence provided by the fossil record, subsequent work has more than borne out his theories, explains Peter Skelton.

Article
Copyrighted  image Icon Copyright: BBC
A brief history of evolution article icon

History & The Arts 

A brief history of evolution

Where are we now along the evolutionary path? Have we stopped evolving? And what does it mean if we have? 

Article
Creative commons image Icon By Eric Fidler on Flickr. under Creative Commons BY-NC 4.0 license
Kropotkin, anarchism and geography: A discussion audio icon

Society, Politics & Law 

Kropotkin, anarchism and geography: A discussion

What links geography to anarchism? Dr Philip O’Sullivan finds the surprising connection lies with a Russian prince who died nearly 100 years ago.

Audio
10 mins
Copyrighted  image Icon Copyright: Cynoclub | Dreamstime.com
Tree of Life activity icon

Nature & Environment 

Tree of Life

Follow evolution and explore the variety of life on the planet with the Tree of Life interactive.

Activity
Creative commons image Icon NASA Goodard Space Flight Center under Creative Commons BY 4.0 license
How do rules on contamination limit our ability to explore space? article icon

Science, Maths & Technology 

How do rules on contamination limit our ability to explore space?

For good reasons, there are rules about how we run the risk of introducing Earth microbes onto other planets. Dave Rothery suggests we might need to relax those standards as we explore further.

Article
Creative commons image Icon International Transport Forum under Creative Commons BY-NC-ND 4.0 license
Inside the mind of a simultaneous translator article icon

Languages 

Inside the mind of a simultaneous translator

The world’s most powerful computers can’t perform accurate real-time translation. Yet interpreters do it with ease. Geoff Watts meets the neuroscientists who are starting to explain this remarkable ability.

Article
Page 1 of 10
Page 1 of 10