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Nature Matters

Nature Matters

About this course

  • 5 hours study
  • Level 3: Advanced

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    • General

  • Course learning outcomes

    By learning this course, the students could understand the useful reason of the systems thinking and the application of environmental responsibility. The students could define how import is environmental pragmatism and cognitive justice as tools for supporting environmental policy and action.


  • Course dates:

    First Published 21/11/2019.

Course content

Below is the course content. You can click on any section here and it will take you through to this section of the course.
  • ExpandContents

  • ExpandIntroduction

  • ExpandLearning Outcomes

  • ExpandFraming Nature Matters : from language to systems thinking

  • ExpandConclusion

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  • Thazin Lwin

    Nature Matters

    Thazin Lwin21 November 2019 8:21

    This unit covers conceptual tools for assisting our thinking and deliberation on what matters. In Section 1, a reading by Ronald Moore acquaint with the notion of ‘framing’ nature, raising the perceived paradox of inevitably devaluing an aesthetically pleasing unframed entity. Two readings by Fritjof Capra and one by Werner Ulrick provide an understanding of systems thinking for explicitly framing issues of environmental responsibility. The development of systems literacy is explored to counter the sometimes debilitating dualistic positioning on environmental matters by Talbott, Light, and Higgs. In Section 2, a reading by Robyn Exkersley explores the importance and limitations of environmental pragmatism for informing policy. It focuses on the concept of helping tools to inform better policy and action regarding environmental matters. Last of all, a reading by Shiv Visvanathan suggests that ideas of cognitive justices are the need for continually developing constructive space between scientific experts and lay experts in order to inform policy and action on what matters that reflects a wider constituency, and that is more specific to eco-cultural circumstances. By learning this course, the students could understand the useful reason of the systems thinking and the application of environmental responsibility. The students could define how import is environmental pragmatism and cognitive justice as tools for supporting environmental policy and action.

About this course

  • 5 hours study
  • Level 3: Advanced

Ratings

0 out of 5 stars

Sign up to get more

You can start learning at any time. By signing up and enrolling you can track your progress and earn a Statement of Participation upon completion, all for free.

View this course

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