2.1.3 Place Value

The value of a digit depends on its place, or position, in the number. Each place has a value of ten times the place to its right. Each position is referred to as a place holder.

You can see in the illustration above that the following is true:

  • 1 is in the ten thousands place.
  • 5 is in the thousands place.
  • 7 is in the hundreds place.
  • 6 is in the tens place.
  • 4 is in the units place.

…  and the number is 15,764, which is spoken as “fifteen thousand, seven hundred and sixty-four.”

So you can now see why zero is so important!  We need it to show that there is nothing at a certain place holder.  Without a zero how could we write 203 or even 10?

Activity symbolActivity: Writing Numbers

In your math notebook, write each number in two other ways.

(a) 92,400

Hint symbol

Discussion

You can use words! Each place holder has a name. Remember to count the places carefully moving from left to right.

Solution symbol

Answer

  • (a) 92,400.
    • 9 ten thousands, 2 thousands, 4 hundreds.
    • Ninety-two thousand, four hundred.
    • 90,000 + 2,000 + 400.

(b) One hundred fourteen thousand, six hundred sixty.

Solution symbol

Answer

  • (b) One hundred fourteen thousand, six hundred sixty.
    • 1 hundred thousand, 1 ten thousand, 4 thousands, 6 hundreds, and 6 tens.
    • 100,000 + 10,000 + 4,000 + 600 + 60.
    • 114,660.

(c) Three million, two hundred and four thousand and sixteen.

Solution symbol

Answer

  • (c) Three million, two hundred and four thousand and sixteen.
    • 3 millions, 2 hundred thousands, no ten thousands, 4 thousands, no hundreds, 1 ten and 6 units.
    • 3,000,000 + 200,000 + 4,000 + 10 + 6.
    • 3,204,016.

2.1.2 Ways of Representing Numbers

2.1.4 Numbers in Standard Form