10.3.1 Designing a Bathroom

In the bathroom described on the previous page, the door is on the shorter wall in the corner, and it is 75 cm wide. A heated towel rail 1 m wide is on the longer wall, 1.25 m from the corner of the bathroom. On the wall opposite the door, there is a window that is 62 cm wide and 91.5 cm from the corner (but at a height of 1.6 m from the floor).

Here is a rough sketch:

What will these measurements be on the plan?

Mark the towel rail and window on the plan. How would you arrange the bathtub, toilet, and basin in the bathroom?

The door is 75 cm wide, and this will be represented by the edge of 75 division 10 equals 7.5 squares, or a length of 75 cm division 20 equals three .75 cm on the plan.

The towel rail is 1 m wide. This is the same as 100 cm, so it will be represented by the edge of 100 division 10 equals 10 squares or a length of 100 cm prefix division of 20 equals five cm on the plan. It is at a distance of 1.25 m or 125 cm from the corner. This length will be represented by the edge of 12.5 squares or by 125 cm division 20 equals six .25 cm.

The window is 62 cm wide, and this will be represented by the edge of 6.2 squares or by a length of 62 cm division 20 equals three .1 cm on the plan. It is 91.5 cm from the corner. This length will be represented by the edge of 9.15 squares or by 91.5 cm prefix division of 20 equals 4.575 cm on the plan. You will have to round these measurements before drawing them on the plan. The diagram shows how the plan should look. (It is not to the scale given above.)

To arrange the bathtub, basin, and toilet, you could cut out shapes drawn to scale and position them on the plan, allowing space around each item. For ease of installation, the toilet should be positioned next to the sewage pipe, but there are several possibilities for the bathtub and basin. If other items such as cupboards are required, you can make scaled shapes for these and add them.

These two examples, the tangram and the bathroom plan, illustrate how diagrams can be used to make practical problems easier to solve. If you are constructing your own scale diagram and have taken a lot of measurements, you may find it clearer to tabulate your results as shown below. Why not try this for a room in your house?

10.4 Geometry