10.2.2  Interpreting the result of the appetite test

Table 10.3 below shows you how to determine whether the child passes or fails the test.

Table 10.3  Appetite test table.

Minimum amount that a malnourished child should take to pass the appetite test
RUTFBP 100
Body weight (kg)SachetBody weight (kg)Bars
< 4⅛-¼< 5¼-½
4 up to 10¼-½5 up to 10½-¾
10 up to 15½-¾10 up to 15¾-1
> 15¾-1> 151-1 ½

Passes the appetite test

A child that takes at least the amount of RUTF shown in the appetite test table passes the appetite test.

You should explain to the caregiver that the treatment option for the child is OTP. You would then register the child’s OTP card (you will learn how to do this later in this study session).

Fails the appetite test

A child who does not take the amount of RUTF shown in the appetite test table fails the appetite test. You should explain to the caregiver that the choice of treatment for the child is in-patient care; and explain the reasons for recommending this. You would then refer the child to the nearest therapeutic feeding unit / stabilisation centre (TFU/SC) for in-patient management. This is a unit in a health centre or hospital where severely malnourished children with complications or poor appetite are referred and managed. Once the complications improve, these children will be referred back to you for continued out-patient follow-up in your health post.

You may have seen a video on outpatient management of severe acute malnutrition in a training session. If not, when at the health centre try to use the opportunity to see the video if it is available. You will be able to see a child who passes the appetite test and another child who fails the appetite test.

10.2.1  The appetite test

10.3  Management of severe acute malnutrition in OTP