3.1.5 Responding to Feedback

Earlier in the unit you saw an animated film where Tina discussed her recent job interview with her friend Sophie. The next activity requires you to watch a video showing a continuation of their conversation where Sophie gives Tina some more feedback.

Activity 3.4: Responding to Feedback

Timing: Allow about 10 minutes for this activity.

Watch the video below, in which Tina receives some more feedback from Sophie. While you watch, take some notes about the feedback that Tina is getting from Sophie, and about Tina’s response to that feedback.

Download this video clip.Video player: Tina receives some more feedback from Sophie
Skip transcript: Tina receives some more feedback from Sophie

Transcript: Tina receives some more feedback from Sophie

Location: Tina and Sophie in the kitchen

Sophie:
Tina, I’ve been thinking about your interview.  You were quite lucky that the interview panel chose an activity you were really good at.
Tina:
Lucky? Why’s that?
Sophie:
Well, you said you didn’t read the interview instructions properly. What if they’d been expecting you to have prepared for a particular task?
Tina:
Oh, I don’t know. I’d have probably got by.
Sophie:
Not necessarily. I know you’re keen on improving your career …
Tina:
Yes, I really am.
Sophie:
Well, there’s a danger that your relaxed approach to things like interviews will stop you achieving your goals, especially if other candidates are very well-prepared.
Tina:
Yes?
Sophie:
Yes! I’ve noticed that sometimes you overlook the fine detail and don’t plan things properly, especially when you’re nervous.
Tina:
Really?
Sophie:
Yes. And if you haven’t prepared well, or haven’t read the interview instructions properly, you could come across as complacent. An interview panel might think you’re not taking their job seriously.
Tina:
I take your point Sophie. I’d not really realised that my nerves can lead to me not planning properly.
Sophie:
No?
Tina:
No. In future I’ll look really closely at the instructions I’m given for any job interviews.
Sophie:
Yes, you could make a checklist of all the things you need to do beforehand.
Tina:
That’s a good idea. Then I’ll know there will be no nasty surprises.  I’ll probably feel more confident that way too.
End transcript: Tina receives some more feedback from Sophie
Tina receives some more feedback from Sophie
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Comment

In this video we see Sophie warning Tina that when she is nervous she sometimes doesn’t pay attention to details such as interview instructions. Tina seems surprised at this feedback as she hadn’t realized that this was one of her characteristics. The feedback from Sophie allows her to increase the size of the open area in her Johari Window, while decreasing the size of her blind area, as she learns something new about herself.

In the next activity you will be asked to think about feedback you have received in the past, and the impact that it had on you.

Activity 3.5: Feedback You Have Had

Timing: Allow about 20 minutes for this activity.

Think back and choose a time when you have received feedback that has had a marked and positive effect on your learning. For example, you might have had a math teacher who gave you confidence in your ability with numbers. As a result, you still enjoy working with figures and use them in daily activities, such as planning your household budget.

Write down the main aspects of the feedback you received. Did this feedback increase what you knew about yourself?

Comment

Again, your response to this activity will be very personal. For this activity you were asked to recall receiving feedback that had a positive impact on your life and hopefully you were able think of a time when you receieved useful and helpful feedback from someone else. Sometimes, though, feedback can be negative or even undermine confidence in our own abilities and it is likely that you will have received this sort of feedback at some point in your life. On the whole, though, it is clear that we need feedback in order to build a picture of what we are good at and what we could improve on. The best way to avoid getting negative, confidence-damaging feedback is to choose as your feedback-givers people that you can trust and who have no “axe to grind.”

3.1.4 The Johari Window

3.1.6 Developing Your Own Johari Window