Managing to meet service users' needs
Managing to meet service users' needs

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Managing to meet service users' needs

2.2 Video activity

This activity asks you to watch the three video clips below.

As you are watching, try to identify any examples you see of consultation and involvement, and what Jane sees as the key factors in the way Redcar & Cleveland Mind has developed these processes. Make notes as you go.

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Transcript: Video 1

Lynette Clark
Jane Reast is director of Redcar and Cleveland Mind, a mental health organisation run by, and for, local people.
Jane Reast
Hi Sam. How’s the DIY?
Sam
Not so bad … getting there slowly. I’ve just got a bit of post for you. There’s something from Mind about the campaign there. There you go.
Lynette Clark
Guiding the project in a collaborative way is an art born of experience.
Jane Reast
Is that all? Ok, give me five minutes, after I’ve done this.
I came to Redcar and Cleveland Mind ten years ago as a development worker, the organisation's first paid worker. I had all sorts of expectations that everybody would be really clear about what it was they wanted, everything would be set up and smooth and running and what they actually wanted was someone to support and develop some services. I was in for a surprise.
Jane Reast
Have you got anything Sam, for the diary?
Sam
Yes, the builders haven’t been in touch about starting today. We haven’t heard from them. Do you want me to give them a chase?
Jane Reast
We can be very, very flexible but we need to know the times and particularly the Redcar day service, because we’ll have to put the backyard out of bounds, health and safety.
Sam
Right, I’ll give them a call.
Lynette Clark
Dealing with problems of day-to-day practice must be combined with a broader vision for the organisation.
Jane Reast
Some people around actually thought they were getting something like a centre manager. Someone who'd actually kind of come in, open up, you know sit there on a morning, look interesting behind a desk, make sure the lights and the bins and the place was clean, and lock and shut the door.
And it seemed really important to me, for my own sanity in some ways, to actually get out and about and make connections.
Jane Reast
Morning everyone.
Everyone
Morning.
Jane Reast
Morning Maureen, morning David, morning Sue, morning Gwen, morning Irene , morning Ted, morning Donna, morning Kendra; morning Ron. How we doing?
Ron
How are you.
Jane Reast
I’m all right, you?
Ron
Not so bad.
Lynette Clark
Making connections has meant working creatively with the local community in a range of distinctive partnerships.
At the heart of the project are the day services, which are constantly evolving in response to the expressed needs of users.
Jane Reast
Our day services are open access and drop-in. The drop-in model is a spring board for people to come together; to support each other, to break down isolation with support.
But nobody has to come. Everybody is free to come and go as they please. Therefore people can vote with their feet.
Woman
Over the years I’ve grown in confidence, do different things, I’ve got a lot of circle of friends here.
Man
The atmosphere’s great. Projects are always on the go. Never time to sit down, mind.
Woman
It’s just like one big happy family. It’s brilliant. You feel safe, you feel comfortable, and you can be yourself, that’s one thing you can be, yourself.
Jane Reast
Hi Terry.
Terry
Hi Jane.
Jane Reast
All right?
Lynette Clark
Co-ordinating the day services is actually the responsibility of day centre staff. Jane works closely with these colleagues and with users to shape the services.
Jane Reast
So are you okay for cover this weekend?
Terry
We’ve everything sorted out for the weekend; all the covers sorted out and they got off on the bus okay today.
Lynette Clark
How is it possible to keep in tune with grass roots feeling about new projects?
Jane Reast
For me, the best place to actually hear what’s on people’s minds is actually just to be around the drop-in.
And it's really, really vital for me not to have my colleagues as the only filter, not because I don't have trust and respect for my colleagues, but I really need to hear that for myself.
As an organisation, we've already got what's called a domain name and a piece of cyberspace that belongs to us, so that the work that you've actually been doing in the project is really, really relevant to actually go on to there.
Nick Murray
It'd be nice for people, if we're to go to a wider audience I think.
Jane Reast
Caroline, did you know that the piece around walking and getting a new hobby was actually on the website?
Caroline
No, I didn’t.
Jane Reast
Didn’t you?
Caroline
No.
Jane Reast
Well do you want to look at yourself in Cyberspace?
Caroline
Yeah.
Woman
Do you want to pop round here and have a look?
Jane Reast
Now potentially everyone knows Caroline Granger walks.
It’s been important to me to ensure there’s genuine service user involvement within ... integral to, not kind of bolted on ... integral to ... an integral part of that partnership, that whole.
Jane Reast
And so, are you going to bring all those notes and thoughts to that meeting with Simon?
Man
You know, so, I mean we’ve got a good size for people to look at on our website.
Jane Reast
And I can absolutely say that I was green and raw, and people taught me what it meant to actually take people with you, and work with people, and be very, very clear about ... with people, and negotiate what it was that we must do, what it was that we might do.
Woman
What it was, was that the number of organisations has grown so we needed to extend the range.
Jane Reast
Right.
Lynette Clark
Under Jane’s stewardship, Redcar and Cleveland Mind has actively fostered links with the wider community. It provides information on mental health services throughout the Teeside area.
End transcript: Video 1
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Video 1
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Transcript: Video 2

Gwen
Everybody's enjoyed themselves, everybody's had a laugh and, more important, everybody's had their own little bit to do, so it's shared by everybody.
Man
Whilst we were painting it, a pigeon actually came over and must have thought it was real and just went smack straight into the wall.
Keith
It's been a really nice project. It's ... everyone's got involved, everyone's been really, really keen, and the nice thing to see is that everyone's taken possession of their own little part of it, the ownership of it. It's very much their mural.
Because this is what Mind's all about. It's about getting people involved and doing things for themselves.
Donna
I've learnt that ... through doing this project ... that no matter how small a piece that anyone's done on the wall, that it’s, as a whole, made a difference to the whole thing. Everyone’s definitely an artist
Lynette Clark
A hallmark of Redcar and Cleveland Mind is that service users are intimately involved in its planning and management.
John
Hiya Jane, it’s nice to be meeting up with you again after the AGM.
Lynette Clark
Jane has regular meetings with trustees who are themselves ordinary members of the organisation.
Jane Reast
I was wondering whether we might do some training with trustees and volunteers. We've got a number of new volunteers now, particularly from East Cleveland.
John
Yeah right.
Jane Reast
Around boundaries ... boundaries for each and every one of us in our work.
John
Oh yeah absolutely, well they are real issues aren't they?
Jane Reast
They are. Where do we hold the training?
John
Ah, well I think we should sort of move away from being Redcar based, if we possibly can.
Jane Reast
Oh that's great to hear you saying that John, actually.
John
A venue out in East Cleveland in the rural bits, you know, Guisborough or Loftus.
Jane Reast
Yeah, that’d be good.
John
That’s a good idea.
Jane Reast
And, if we do the hard work, then we can do the network.
Lynette Clark
Networking is a crucial element of Jane’s role. With day services spread across a number of locations, Jane has had to learn the art of managing at a distance. But she makes regular visits for key events at any of the day service venues.
Gary
Every Wednesday we run a lunch club, and essentially what we try and do is get everybody involved in some ... some part of the preparation of the meal, whether that's preparing the shopping list, going and getting the shopping from the shops, or actually preparing the food itself. I mean, that's the idea really of creating jobs for everybody, so everybody gets a little bit of something to do, and it feels ... feels like they're participating and got involved in it.
Mabel
We all muck in. And some wash up, and some wipe up, but that’s what it’s all about ... the Mind. Everybody, you know, helps one another.
Lynette Clark
Jane’s visits are a chance to listen and respond to people’s concerns ... but how best to strike the balance between delegating and remaining hands-on?
Jane Reast
The first point of service user to me is often paid colleagues. But I too still have a role, and it’s a different role, leading from a different place, catalysing from a different place. Any other issues?
Gary
I think another issue is really being around putting, sort of, own people in residential homes, and us... it brings up funny boundaries for us. It’s difficult for us to bring some things up. It’s really about sharing information about service users particularly. But it can be very awkward. It’s like treading on eggshells sometimes because things we would normally say, we’re finding that we can’t. You know, we have to be sort of ... I mean we can’t say anything about, we fall back a bit.
Jane Reast
Ok, is this something we could explore in supervision next week?
Gary
That’s fine, yeah.
Jane Reast
Really?
Gary
Really, honestly, yeah.
Jane Reast
And if it isn’t soon enough, if its safety issues for individuals ... abuse concerns or anything ...
It is crucial that I let go. And, in letting go, I'm also there to support. There's a difference between letting go and abandoning, an absolutely crucial difference.
People need to still feel that there is genuine commitment, support, understanding, when the chips are down, when the unexpected happens, when people are frightened, when things go wrong, when people as well can feel safe to say, “I don't know about that” ... and equally that I can be transparent and say, “I don't know that one, but we can find out together”.
End transcript: Video 2
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Transcript: Video 3

Lynette Clark
Securing the funds to sustain a diverse range of projects in a responsive way is a constant challenge for Jane as a manager.
Jane Reast
We are, in business terms of course, now actually a small to medium size enterprise. We are social entrepreneurs. I lead that social entrepreneurship. There was a time when I felt rather uncomfortable about that, but not anymore. If it means that, through my knowledge skills and experience ... that I can be a route to the loot for people to ... for us to get what it is that we need and want, to maintain and sustain our organisation, then that's good enough for me.
Lynette Clark
The key has been to develop strategic collaborations with other organisations. Redcar and Cleveland Mind are now embracing more formal partnerships with social services, health and the voluntary sector.
A bus poster campaign to raise mental health awareness is the fruit of one of these joint ventures.
Pam Bunce
That’s great. I think it’s great.
Jane Reast
Do you like it?
Pam Bunce
I do. I like the colours as well. I think it says exactly what we want it to.
Sue Reeves
If you imagine that you’re in the car and you’re looking at that, it’s just a simple message, which gets across really quickly I feel. Really clear.
Ian Holliday
If you think how many times you sit in traffic behind a bus, it’s a message that will get across.
Pam Bunce
I do think that people do read messages on buses, and the fact that we’ve put a message around mental health promotion is really, really important.
Jane Reast
We’ve managed to convey that it’s a local partnership, and it’s linking to the national agenda.
Partnerships now are the only game in town. It interests me hugely in terms of the fact that there is now a requirement to partner. The directive to partner in is not helpful. People need to want to partner, to want to engage together, to realise that it's relevant for some collective shared aspiration or experience, that everybody can gain something from it.
Okay I think we need to decide what it is we actually want to achieve from this today, yeah.
Everyone
Yes
Jane Reast
We've got the action plan here, and I'm suggesting that we need to now break this down, decide next steps, and who does what.
Ian Holliday
We have to submit them, first of all, to the chief executives of all the partner agencies.
Sue Reeves
I think this is just so exciting, that we're moving it forward in this way now, don't you?
Pam Bunce
Yes, I'm really pleased that mental health promotion is on the agenda but, when we're competing for funding, you know, what priority will this be given, and that really is a matter of concern.
Jane Reast
I hear what you’re saying Pam. I think it's highly significant that people who are members of the local strategic partnership actually turned out to the bus poster launch. If that isn’t them putting mental health promotion up the agenda, then I don’t know what is.
Pam Bunce
Having a shared vision means that, as a group, as a partnership, you can move forward, and you can do more for your target group than you can do in isolation.
Sue Reeves
And I think, at the end of the day, we mustn't forget that the reason that we are working together isn't for ourselves, it's for the people who actually require services - those service users, those carers whose views are really, really important and have to be taken on board.
Ian Holliday
It's a difficult task, and I do feel it needs somebody with the sort of commitment and drive to actually bring those, those agencies together to break down some of the existing cultural and professional boundaries that do exist.
Jane Reast
Partnerships also need leaders.
End transcript: Video 3
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Jane Reast went on to say that different leaders are required at different times. She explained that there needs to be explicit permission given by partners to different people at different times, in order that things can be moved forward.

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