Debate: Stepmother jag

Updated Saturday 20th August 2005

Forum member Geraldine Monk had a question about Lancashire phrases

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I have never come across anyone outside the Blackburn area of Lancashire that knows or uses this term for those annoying shards that grow down the side of the fingernail and inflame the finger. I've got umpteen books on Lancashire dialect and it never listed.

Does anyone else in the country (or even county) use it? If not it is surely one of the most localised words in the British dialect.

 

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