• Activity
  • 1 hour
  • Level 1: Introductory

Choose your own philosophy adventure

Updated Wednesday 26th June 2013

'Castle, Forest, Island, Sea' is a choose-your-own-adventure story that explores key questions in philosophy. Where will your chosen path lead you?

Castle, Forest, Island, Sea

From bickering birds to scary monsters, choose your quest and find your way out of the castle.

There are nine chapters exploring key questions in philosophy and it will take approximately 30-60 minutes to complete your adventure. As you navigate through the story, the game will build up an idea of how you feel about these questions, and at the end of the game you'll receive an analysis of your choices and a map of how your opinions compare to different philosophers through the ages.

Are you ready to turn the first page? If so, select the image below to open the book...

Open the book

Please note:

This interactive feature will open in a pop-up window. To play in full-screen mode, hold down the Ctrl key and select the 'Open the book' link above. This will open the book in a new browser tab.

For best results, use a modern web browser. Upgrade to the latest version of Internet Explorer or try a free alternative like Google Chrome, Firefox or Safari.

 

For further information, take a look at our frequently asked questions which may give you the support you need.

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