• Video

Lysistrata by Aristophanes

Updated Tuesday 29th October 2013

Enjoy Aristophanes' comic account of one woman's extraordinary method of bringing The Peloponnesian War to an end. 

WARNING: This animated version of the play Lysistrata contains scenes of nudity and sexual content.

Transcript

With thanks to Professor Oliver Taplin for his translation of this play.

 

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