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  • 5 mins
  • Level 1: Introductory

Origin Day Lecture: Audience Question Two

Updated Tuesday 24th November 2009

If Darwin were alive today, what area of evolutionary science would he be working in, and why?

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EO Wilson Copyrighted image Icon Copyright: British Council Professor EO Wilson's lecture to mark Origin Day

 
 

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