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A Victorian Christmas: Victoria's Christmas

Updated Friday 18th December 2015

Victoria spends Christmas 1837 with a "merry" Lord Melbourne.

Lord Melbourne Copyright free image Icon Copyright free: Public domain Lord Melbourne in a less merry mode Thursday, 25th December.- Christmas Day. Got up at ½ p.9 and breakfasted at ½ p.10. Wrote to the Queen Dowager and wrote my journal. At 12 I went with Ma., Lady Mulgrave, Miss Dillon, Miss Cocks, Lady Mary, Lord Falkland, Col: Grey, and Mr. Rich, to the Chapel Royal at St.James's. Mr. Anderson (from Brighton) preached. The sermon was a good one though rather too long. The Text was from the 12th chap: of Isaiah, i, 2, and 3 verses. We then took the Sacrament.

Came home at a ¼ to 3. The service at the Chapel really is too long. Drew.

At 10 m. to 4 came my good Lord Melbourne and stayed with me till 10 m. to 5. He seemed well I thought. Talked of many things - of the service at the Chapel of Mr. Anderson's preaching - about Cracow - Belgium, &c.,&c.

Drew. Wrote to dearest Uncle Leopold. Lehzengave me yesterday in my name, a pencil and an Annual to Col: Cavendish and the same to Mr. Cowper. Wrote my journal.

At ½ p.7 we dined. Besides we 11 (Miss Davys having gone home), Lord Melbourne, Lord Surrey, and Col: Mrs, and Miss Cavendish dined here. Lord Melbourne led me in and I sat between him and Lord Falkland. I was happy to see Lord Melbourne in very good spirits and looking very well. Talked about many things; about holy;- he calls the variegated holy not the “natural” holly; about the Irish and their poverty; about many other things of little consequence. Lord Melbourne was very merry.

After dinner I sat on the sofa with Ma. part of the time (for she left the drawing-room at a ¼ p. 10) and the remainder with Lady Mulgrave; Lord Melbourne sitting near me the whole evening. Talked to him about the Maids of Honour, about whom he is always very funny; he has a very peculiar laugh; it is so joyous and truly merry, and makes one laugh when one hears it. Spoke to me about Ma., about the Duchess of Bedford, about his sister, &c.,&c.

Lord Melbourne fears he will be unable to get out of Town till after Thursday which he is sorry for, particularly on account of this business of the Speaker's or “this unlucky manoeuvre of the Speaker” as Lord Melbourne called it, and which I shall now mention.

The Speaker sent in his resignation on Saturday night, which is very wrong of him to do, as it embarrasses us a good deal. Lord Melbourne says that the Speaker is very touchy and complained that he had not been well supported, particularly by Lord John, which Lord Melbourne says is quite unfounded; Lord Melbourne likewise said, that several people said that the Speaker had not done his business well, this last Session, and had made several mistakes, and Lord Melbourne thinks perhaps he felt that and was angry with himself. Lord Melbourne spoke to me in the afternoon of the different people who he thought might do as Speaker. He spoke to me of the King of Hanover's foolish proceedings; of the Duke of Cambridge and of some particulars of the Disturbances in Canada.

I said to Lord Melbourne I hoped he would stay a few days when he came down to Windsor; he said he would certainly, and that he would come down on the 4th of 5th of Jan.; which I am very glad of; I wish he could come sooner, but that would be unreasonable. I said to him I was afraid I teazed him very often, upon which he answered in the kindest manner imaginable “Oh! not in the least”. Stayed up till 20 m. p.11. It was a delightful evening; alas! the last delightful evening I shall pass in London for 3 weeks to come!

 

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