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Poetry Prescription

Updated Thursday 18th September 2014

Feeling loving, adventurous or scared? Poetry Prescription will find you the perfect poem to reflect your mood. 

Poetry prescription interface with the text 'Poetry Prescription prescribes a poem to suit your mind. What's on your mind?' embedded in the image. Copyrighted image Icon Copyright: The Open University

Find a poem to suit your mood

 

Expand to see the full list of acknowledgements

Acknowledgements

‘What if this road’ by Sheenagh Pugh, from Id’s Hospit (Seren, 1997)

From ‘Drysalter’ by Michael Symmons Roberts. Published by Vintage. Reprinted by permission of the Random House Group Limited

Reproduced with permission of Curtis Brown Group Ltd., London on behalf of The Trustees of the Pooh Properties. Copyright © Trustees of the Pooh Properties 1927

Fleur Adstock ‘Against Coupling’, Poems 1960-2000, Bloodaxe Books, 2000. Reprinted with permission of Bloodaxe Books, on behalf of the author

Clare Brant, ‘Eggs’ from Dark Egg, Shoestring Press, used with permission

Jane Kenyon, ‘Happiness’ from Collected Poems. Copyright © 2005 by the Estate of Jane Kenyon. Used with the permission for The Permissions Company, Inc. on behalf of Graywolf Press, www.graywolfpress.org

All images in Poetry Prescription were provided by Unsplash except:

'Baby Shoes' by Nedra under CC-BY-NC-SA 2.0 licence.

'Yoho Road' by James Wheeler under CC-BY-NC-SA 2.0 licence

'Bunratty Castle Jacobean Bed' by B y Fredi under CC-BY-2.0 licence.

'White Corset Closeup' by Photowitch | Dreamstime.com

'Snowscape Over Scottish Loch' by Bred2k8 | Dreamstime.com

'Haze Hills Landscape' by Andriy Markov | Dreamstime.com

 

Feeling inspired? 

If you liked Poetry Prescription you may want to try rewriting the Bard's poems and prose in our Fakespeare interactive, or even try a FREE course on poetry; we've got a great variety of literature content to suit your needs.

 

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