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Society, Politics & Law

Preparing For Development

Updated Tuesday 8th August 2006

Try a sample Open University course, with this extract from Preparing For Development

A baby in Uganda Image: Tim Allen Copyrighted image Icon Copyright: Tim Allen - photographer

After studying this sample of a genuine Open University course, you should be able to:
- understand that "health" is a concept much broader than "lack of disease"
- explain the variations in disease patterns between countries, and the impact ofgender, education and poverty on disease;
- understand the difference between preventative and curative approaches tohealthcare, and explain their combination in primary healthcare;
- analyse how even a materially poor country can have a health record that iscomparable to that of a much richer country.

You will also have practice in the following study skills:
-summarizing an article systematically by using key concepts;
-identifying and interpreting correlations between sets of data;
and drawing a graph to illustrate a correlation

You'll be asked to study some tables and evidence and, based on this, some advice and hints, and your own knowledge, you'll be invited to supply answers to questions. We'll then show you some model answers, to compare with your own.

Finally, you'll be guided through the preparation of an essay.

If this all sounds a little daunting, don't worry - everything will be clearly explained along the way - just as with a real Open University Course. (Actually, that's exactly what this is - we've adapted this from the Preparing for Development course, with just a couple of changes to make it work on the web).

You might find a pen and paper handy, and there are a couple of downloads along the way for you to fill in.

We've split the sample up into six sections, to make it easier for you to complete in your own time - again, like a real Open University course.

Section one: What do we mean by 'health'?
Section two: Patterns of disease - Looking at the evidence
Section three: Gender and disease
Section four: Disease and education
Section five: Poverty and disease
Section six: Improving health

About this sample

This course sample is adapted from Preparing For Development, part of the U213: International Development: Challenges for a world in transition and TU871: Development: Context and practice courses.

 

For further information, take a look at our frequently asked questions which may give you the support you need.

Have a question?

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