Future energy demand and supply
Future energy demand and supply

Start this free course now. Just create an account and sign in. Enrol and complete the course for a free statement of participation or digital badge if available.

Free course

Future energy demand and supply

References

The information in this course has been obtained from a wide range of sources, too numerous to mention. However, specific reference is made in the text to the following:
Bond, C. (2004) in Keeping the wheels turning, online article available from http://www.amec.com/about/about.asp?PAGEID=912 [last accessed January 2006].
Boulding, K. (c. 1980); quoted in Douthwaite, R. (1992) The Growth Illusion: How Economic Growth Has Enriched the Few, Impoverished the Many, and Endangered the Planet, Lilliput Press, Dublin.
BP (2004) Statistical Review of World Energy 2004, available online at http://www.bp.com [last accessed August 2010]
BP (2005) Statistical Review of World Energy 2005, available online at http://www.bp.com [last accessed August 2010]
Department for Transport (DfT) Transport Statistics page. Statistics on UK transport. Available online from http://www.dft.gov.uk/pgr/statistics [last accessed December 2007].
Department of Trade and Industry (2003) Energy White Paper Our Energy Future — Creating a Low Carbon Economy, The Stationery Office, London. Available online from http://www.berr-ec.com/ [last accessed December 2007].
Department of Trade and Industry (dti) Information and statistics on trends in UK energy industry. Available online from http://www.berr-ec.com/ [last accessed December 2007].
Fells, I. (2004) Energy Management Group of the Institute of Physics, November 2004 London, and BBC Online, Tuesday 27 July, 2004.
Griew, S. (2004) 'Gas and electricity demand; drivers and prospects over the next ten years' in conference proceedings 'Energy Demand—Spiralling Out of Control' 17 November 2004, organised by Energy Management Group of the Institute of Physics, London.
International Institute for Applied SystemsAnalysis (IIASA) and World Energy Council (WEC) (1998) Global Energy Perspectives. Summary available online from http://www.worldenergy.org/ [last accessed January 2006].
Kemp, S. (2005) letter to The Guardian, Friday 20 May, 2005.
Lazarus, M., Bartels, C., Bernow, S., Greber, L., Hall, J., Hansen, E. and Raskin, P. (1993) 'Towards global energy security: The next energy transition', Tellus Institute, Boston. Published by Greenpeace International, Towards a fossil free energy future, Greenpeace, Amsterdam.
Sheldon, P. (2005) Earth's Physical Resources: An Introduction (Book 1 of S278 Earth's Physical Resources: Origin, Use and Environmental Impact), The Open University, Milton Keynes.
Shell International (2001) Energy Needs, Choices and Possibilities —Scenarios to 2050. Available online from http://www.cleanenergyfunds.org/casestudies/shell-2050.pdf [last accessed December 2007].
The Royal Commission on Environmental Pollution (2000) 22nd Report: Energy: the Changing Climate, Chapter 9; The Stationery Office, London. Available online from http://www.rcep.org.uk/newenergy.htm [last accessed December 2007].
Tickell, O. (2005) quoting G. Sinden, Environmental Change Institute, Oxford, in The Guardian, Thursday 12 May, 2005.
Toynbee, P. (2005) The Guardian, Wednesday 25 May, 2005.
S278_19

Take your learning further

Making the decision to study can be a big step, which is why you'll want a trusted University. The Open University has 50 years’ experience delivering flexible learning and 170,000 students are studying with us right now. Take a look at all Open University courses.

If you are new to University-level study, we offer two introductory routes to our qualifications. You could either choose to start with an Access module, or a module which allows you to count your previous learning towards an Open University qualification. Read our guide on Where to take your learning next for more information.

Not ready for formal University study? Then browse over 1000 free courses on OpenLearn and sign up to our newsletter to hear about new free courses as they are released.

Every year, thousands of students decide to study with The Open University. With over 120 qualifications, we’ve got the right course for you.

Request an Open University prospectus371