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Travelling Objects

Updated Monday, 11th September 2017

Journey around the world in our interactive to discover how 'objects' aren't just merely beautiful art works but can also reveal fascinating histories and global connections.

Travelling Objects image Creative commons image Icon The Open University under Creative Commons BY-NC-SA 4.0 license Select the image above to start your journey.

Please note: We've included references in a simple style for this open access resource. However, if you want to use these references in an academic manner please use our FREE course Developing good academic practice for guidance on proper referencing and formatting.  

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Acknowledgements

The text content within the interactive is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Licence

The image material acknowledged within the interactive is used under licence (not subject to Creative Commons Licence). Grateful acknowledgement is made to the sources for permission to reproduce material in this interactive.

Every effort has been made to contact copyright owners. If any have been inadvertently overlooked, the publishers will be pleased to make the necessary arrangements at the first opportunity.

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