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Investigating Psychology

Updated Monday 8th December 2014

Investigate the conceptual and historical issues in Psychology with this interactive feature.

Investigating Psychology is a tool to enable you to explore the development of psychological thinking not only across time, but also within the context of social, conceptual and historical changes; the development and application of different perspectives and methods; and through chains of influence between researchers.

Instructions

For best results, use a modern web browser. Upgrade to the latest version of Internet Explorer or try a free alternative like Google Chrome, Firefox or Safari.

Playing on a tablet or mobile device?

Play in full-screen mode, select the 'Start Investigating Psychology' link and open the feature in a new browser tab.

What are we missing?

It is our hope that the Investigating Psychology resource will continue to grow over the years, so if there is a person, context, perspective or method that you feel should be included, please email us with a description and the reasons for its inclusion. Thank you.

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