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Debate: The hardest question

Updated Tuesday 4th November 2008

Forum member Johnny raised a fundamental question - one we might never answer

A bronze of Rodin's The Thinker Copyrighted image Icon Copyright: Jupiter Images

Say we where just a just a bunch of chemical and physical reactions with no cognition, no thought, no good, no bad, no right or wrong?

I know its hard to imagine, its hard to explain - maybe someone could. I am sure I am not the first person to arrive here at this conclusion.

I'm sure you will see a contradiction in this but a lot of thought got me to this point but does anyone else believe this?

 

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