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To lie or not to lie?

Updated Tuesday 25th January 2011

A lie’s a lie, right? But what if it wasn’t that simple? This game makes you think about your moral responses to different lies

To lie or not to lie cartoon game image. Copyrighted image Icon Copyright: The Open University

Launch To lie or not to lie? now

Philosophical consultant: Professor Tim Chappell

Credits: Spartacus clip - used under 'crit and review'. The content must be kept within the context of the interactive at all times.

Photos: Getty images and PA Image

 

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