Heritage, whose heritage?: Track 1

Featuring: Audio Audio

How should Stonehenge be conserved for the future? The modernisation of the Visitors' Centre at Stonehenge has been a battleground, exposing conflicting interests, and revealing the challenges that can lie behind the preservation of heritage sites. This album explores how different values and perceptions of heritage affect how the past is safeguarded, examining the British preoccupation with the built environment. Heritage can impart a sense of national identity and preserve memories and associations, but for whom? This material forms part of The Open University course A180 Heritage, whose heritage?

By: The iTunes U team (Programme and web teams)

  • Duration 1 hour
  • Updated Monday 8th March 2010
  • Introductory level
  • Posted under History & The Arts
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Track 1: Heritage, whose heritage?

A short introduction to this album


© The Open University 2008


Tracks in this podcast:

Track   Title Description
1 Heritage, whose heritage?    A short introduction to this album Play now Heritage, whose heritage?
2 Historical property management by National Trust    The issues and challenges behind the safeguarding of heritage properties by the UK's National Trust. Play now Historical property management by National Trust
3 Stonehenge and its significance    Stonehenge as a heritage site valued for differing reasons by a wide range of interested parties. Play now Stonehenge and its significance
4 Managing Stonehenge    Management of heritage sites like Stonehenge incorporates different stakeholders and usually results in a conflict of interests. Play now Managing Stonehenge
5 The concept of heritage    What does heritage mean? A professor of cultural studies discusses how concepts of heritage have changed. Play now The concept of heritage
6 Perceptions of heritage    Comparisons between British and Afro-caribbean values and concepts of heritage. Play now Perceptions of heritage
7 Save Britain's Heritage    How architectural heritage is fundamental to a sense of nationhood and identity and why it's vital to preserve it, according to campaign group Save. Play now Save Britain's Heritage

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