Skip to content

Pygmalion meets Buffy the Vampire Slayer: Track 1

Featuring: Video Video Audio Audio

The popular American TV series "Buffy the Vampire Slayer" spanned seven seasons and gained a cult following. But how is it linked to the culture of ancient Greece and Rome? On closer inspection, its characters and narratives are revealed to be new incarnations of ancient classical myths that have filtered down into modern media. This album explores one episode, "I Was Made to Love You", in which Warren creates an artificial perfect girlfriend, just as Pygmalion sculpts an ivory statue to be his partner in Ovid's Metamorphoses. Many interesting parallels demonstrate the way in which universal human anxieties about gender identity, femininity, control and sexuality are continuously being re-examined through myth. This material forms part of The Open University course A330 Myth in the Greek and Roman worlds.

By: The iTunes U team (Programme and web teams)

  • Duration 55 mins
  • Updated Tuesday 17th August 2010
  • Advanced level
  • Posted under History & The Arts
Share on Google Plus Share on LinkedIn View article Comments
Print

Track 1: Pygmalion meets Buffy the Vampire Slayer

A short introduction to this album.


© The Open University 2010


Tracks in this podcast:

Track   Title Description
1 Pygmalion meets Buffy the Vampire Slayer    A short introduction to this album. Play now Pygmalion meets Buffy the Vampire Slayer
2 Pygmalion and Popular Culture: Paula James    How an episode of Buffy the Vampire Slayer parallels the myth of Pygmalion. Play now Pygmalion and Popular Culture: Paula James
3 Pygmalion and Popular Culture: Lorna Jowett    Gender, femininity and identity in TV's Buffy the Vampire Slayer. Play now Pygmalion and Popular Culture: Lorna Jowett
4 Pygmalion and Popular Culture: Amanda Potter    How viewers of Buffy the Vampire Slayer relate to the storyline as a modern reworking of Ovid's Pygmalion myth. Play now Pygmalion and Popular Culture: Amanda Potter
5 From Pygmalion to Buffy: re-interpreting myth    Open University academic Paula James explains the links between Buffy the Vampire Slayer and classical mythology. Play now From Pygmalion to Buffy: re-interpreting myth
6 Why study myth?    Chris Emlyn-Jones, Valerie Hope and Paula James reveal the enduring importance of myth. Play now Why study myth?
7 A330: Myth in the Greek and Roman worlds    How story and myth are embedded into the monuments and artefacts of ancient Greece and Rome. Play now A330: Myth in the Greek and Roman worlds

Copyright information

Tags, Ratings and Social Bookmarking

Ratings

Share

Reload rating

Be the first to post a comment

Leave a comment
Sign in or create your OpenLearn account to join the discussion.

We invite you to discuss this subject, but remember this is a public forum.
Please be polite, and avoid your passions turning into contempt for others. We may delete posts that are rude or aggressive; or edit posts containing contact details or links to other websites.

Other content you may like

History & The Arts 

Greek Heroes in Popular Culture Through Time

What does ‘2001: a Space Odyssey’ have to do with Odysseus? How does Brad Pitt's Achilles in 'Troy' match up to Homer's original hero? And is Arnold Schwarzenegger the new Heracles? This collection of video animations and audio discussions examines how the heroes of Greek mythology have been represented in popular culture, from ancient times to the modern day. Odysseus is the archetypal questing hero - a blank canvas on which every era has projected its own values. Heracles is the original strongman. And Achilles is the fighter whose sexuality vies with his heel for popular attention. The videos mix archive film and TV clips with character animation, bringing a playful approach to classical myth, while the audio discussions shine a more scholarly light on how today’s popular culture sees these myths differently from the Ancient Greeks.

Video
1 hr
The power of popular culture Creative commons image Icon By Ben Sutherland via Flickr under Creative Commons license under Creative-Commons license article icon

History & The Arts 

The power of popular culture

Mark Banks explores the power of popular culture, as Thinking Allowed looks at comic book heroes.

Article
article icon

History & The Arts 

Cultural studies and what to do now

Jason Toynbee takes us into the world of cultural studies

Article
Iain Stewart introduces Journeys From The Centre Of The Earth Copyrighted image Icon Copyright: Production team article icon

TV, Radio & Events 

Iain Stewart introduces Journeys From The Centre Of The Earth

The warm sun, the blue sea, the wonderful food - the Mediterranean certainly has its attractions. But the landscape is more than the backdrop to a great holiday - it tells the story of civilisations, as Iain's welcome explains.

Article
World-Changing Women: Madam CJ Walker Copyright free image Icon Copyright free: Public Domain article icon

History & The Arts 

World-Changing Women: Madam CJ Walker

As a single woman in the early 20th century making ends meet was no easy feat, so it's remarkable that Madam CJ Walker became the first female self-made millionaire in America. Read her story here...

Article
Roaring Twenties? Europe in the interwar period free course icon Level 3 icon

History & The Arts 

Roaring Twenties? Europe in the interwar period

While recognising the shadows cast by two world wars (one concluded and one imminent) over European society during the 1920s and 1930s, this free course, Roaring Twenties? Europe in the interwar period, demonstrates how a number of specific features indicate that the interwar period was a distinctive and important moment of modernity in the twentieth century, from the rise of the metropolis and the emergence of new forms of mass media, to the changing lifestyles of women and the increasingly interventionist approaches to managing the health and welfare of modern populations.

Free course
14 hrs
Making sense of art history Copyrighted image Icon Copyright: Used with permission free course icon Level 1 icon

History & The Arts 

Making sense of art history

You can prepare for this free course, Making sense of art history, by looking around you. It's likely that wherever you are you'll be able to see some images. It's also likely that many of these will be intended to have some sort of effect on you. In the course itself you will be exploring the power of images via a study of contemporary art from the 1980s onwards. Taking the time to look beyond the immediate appearance of an art work to consider what the artist might be trying to say can be immensely rewarding.

Free course
5 hrs
History of reading tutorial 1: Finding evidence of reading in the past Copyrighted image Icon Copyright: Used with permission free course icon Level 2 icon

History & The Arts 

History of reading tutorial 1: Finding evidence of reading in the past

How do we know what people read in the past, and how they read it? This free course, History of reading tutorial 1: Finding evidence of reading in the past, is the first in a series of tutorials designed to help users of the UK Reading Experience Database (UK RED) search, browse and use the resource, and explores the types of evidence historians have uncovered about the history of reading. Tutorial 2 (Red_2) and Tutorial 3 (Red_3) look at how this evidence can be used to tell us about the reception of a literary text and to demonstrate the impact of a writers reading on their literary output. UK RED is a resource built and maintained at The Open University.

Free course
2 hrs
Visit Poet's Corner Copyrighted image Icon Copyright: Acrasia, c.1888 (oil and gold paint on canvas), Strudwick, John Melhuish (1849-1937) / Private Collection / Photo © Peter Nahum at The Leicester Galleries, London / Bridgeman Images activity icon

History & The Arts 

Visit Poet's Corner

Adventure into Edmund Spenser's The Faerie Queene, as you take pleasure in a painting and visit Poet's Corner.

Activity