Repatriation and returning remains: Track 1

Featuring: Video Video Audio Audio

19th Century philosopher Jeremy Bentham allowed his body to be put on public display after he passed on but would you allow your body to be displayed after you die? The following video and audio collection examines specific cases in which the issue of display and ownership are raised and explores how museums have handled this question. Experts share reasons for their beliefs regarding repatriation and refer to specific examples on the topic of whether remains should be returned to their country of origin. This material forms part of the Open University course A151 Making sense of things: an introduction to material culture.

By: The iTunes U team (Programme and web teams)

  • Duration 30 mins
  • Updated Tuesday 21st February 2012
  • Introductory level
  • Posted under History & The Arts
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Track 1: Encountering a body

Nigel Warburton discusses two different cases regarding the issue of consent when displaying human remains.


© The Open University 2012


Tracks in this podcast:

Track   Title Description
1 Encountering a body    Nigel Warburton discusses two different cases regarding the issue of consent when displaying human remains. Play now Encountering a body
2 Torres Strait remains    The Natural History Museum in London gave back 138 ancestral remains to the Torres Strait islands. Play now Torres Strait remains
3 Objections to Repatriation    Tiffany Jenkins argues against repatriation Play now Objections to Repatriation

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