Veiling: Tradition, Identity and Fashion: Track 1

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Why do Muslim women wear the hijab? How do they reconcile different approaches to veiling between generations, across different geographical regions and in different cultural and social environments? How do they negotiate diverse social and cultural influences, pressures and expectations, legal constraints, practical challenges and fashion trends? In this collection we explore the extraordinary range of different styles of Muslim dress and the emotions people can invest in them. Track 1 looks at different attitudes towards veiling in the Southern Indian city of Calicut (also known as Kozhikode), and in tracks 2, 3 and 4, Stefanie Sinclair, Open University Lecturer in Religious Studies, talks to the anthropologist Emma Tarlo, of Goldsmiths, University of London, about different attitudes among British Muslims towards veiling, fashion and the commercialisation of the hijab. This material forms part of the Open University course A332 Why is religion controversial?

By: The iTunes U team (Programme and web teams)

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Track 1: Veiling in the Southern Indian City of Calicut

Exploring the many varieties of religious veil worn by the Muslim women of Calicut (Kozhikode).


© The Open University


Tracks in this podcast:

Track   Title Description
1 Veiling in the Southern Indian City of Calicut    Exploring the many varieties of religious veil worn by the Muslim women of Calicut (Kozhikode). Play now Veiling in the Southern Indian City of Calicut
2 Why do Muslim women adopt hijab?    What are the factors that affect a Muslim womans decision to cover their hair, and even their faces, with the hijab? Play now Why do Muslim women adopt hijab?
3 Attitudes towards the hijab as a fashion item    Has the hijab become an expression not just of tradition and identity, but of fashion? Play now Attitudes towards the hijab as a fashion item
4 Commercialisation of the hijab    Is Muslim dress becoming its own form of commercial fashion? How does the Muslim modest fashion industry differ from the mainstream fashion industry? Play now Commercialisation of the hijab

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