• Activity
  • 5 mins
  • Level 1: Introductory

Explore the baking and culture of Europe: Norway

Updated Tuesday 28th February 2012

Our furthest journey north discovers the warm heart of a cold country

Norway shown on a map of Europe

Introduction: English

The Norwegian short summers, cold climate, limited areas of arable farmland and proximity of the sea have influenced traditions for food production, including bread, cakes and baking. There is a wide variety of traditional bread and cakes in Norway, and its said that Norwegians probably eat more bread than any other Europeans. Norwegian bread is typically made from wheat or rye flour. Many people are surprised to find that potato is also a common ingredient in some traditional Norwegian bread recipes, notably lefse.

Introduction: Norwegian

De norske korte somre, kaldt klima, begrensede områder av dyrkbar jord og nærhet til havet har påvirket tradisjoner for matproduksjon, inkludert brød, kaker og baking. Det er et bredt utvalg av tradisjonelle brød og kaker i Norge, og det sies at nordmenn sannsynligvis spiser mer brød enn noen andre europeere.

Norsk brød er vanligvis laget av hvete eller rugmel. Mange er overrasket over å finne at potet er også en vanlig ingrediens i noen tradisjonelle norske oppskrifter, spesielt lefse.

 

Norwegian

Skolebrød er en favoritt blandt bade barna og voksne i Norge. Skolebrod bestar av en grunnbolle med vaniljekrem , melis og kokos.

Er det noe jeg alltid unner meg nar jeg er pa besok i Norge, sa er det ett skolebrod med ettermiddags kaffen!

English

Skolebrød is a favourite among both children and adults in Norway. Skolebrod is a small cake with vanilla cream, powdered sugar and coconut.

My special treat when I'm visiting Norway is skolebrød with afternoon coffee!

Image: roboppy under Creative Commons license

 

Lefse

Lefse is a traditional soft, Norwegian flatbread made from potato, milk or cream and flour.

It’s cooked on a griddle with special long turning sticks and rolling pins. The most popular flavouring is to roll it up in butter, but it may be enjoyed with any sweet or savoury filling including fish.

Image: Vrangtante Brun under Creative Commons license

 

Skillingsbolle

Skillingsbolle or kanelbolle is the popular Norwegian cinnamon roll, a firm favourite with adults and children alike.

The dough is left to leaven slowly overnight and then spread with butter, sugar and cinnamon before being shaped and left to rise again.

Image: Jill under Creative Commons license

 

Kneippbrod

Sebastian Kneipp, a German priest and doctor, was famous for his hydrotherapy cures. He also advocated the use of wholewheat flour in baking.

Norwegians probably consume more bread than most other Europeans, and the most popular type is the kneippbrod, named after Dr. Kneipp.

Image: dugspr under Creative Commons license

 

Skolebrød

Skolebrød, literally translated as ‘schoolbread’, is a very popular treat for children’s school lunches or special outings.

These delicious cakes are filled with a rich vanilla cream and dipped in shredded coconut to provide the tasty topping.

Image: roboppy under Creative Commons license

 

Surdeigsbrød

Surdeigsbrød translates as soda bread.

Image: Atle Brunvoli under Creative Commons license

 

Loff

Loff is a plain white loaf used for sandwiches, which may be open or closed.

Image: Atle Brunvoli under Creative Commons license

 

Flatbrød

Flatbrød translates literally as ‘flatbread’, a traditional unleavened bread enjoyed in Norway since the earliest times.

Its usually made from barley flour, although in some regions it may also include mashed potato. There are numerous variations today, but the secret is to roll it out as thinly as possible.

Image: Atle Brunvoli under Creative Commons license

 

Grove rundstykker

Grove rundstykker are multigrain rolls. They are often served at breakfast alongside many other varieties of bread and cereals.

Image: aarsvoin under Creative Commons license

 

Knekkebrød

Knekkebrød is Norwegian for the high fibre crispbreads, now found in supermarkets throughout Europe and North America, made by a wide range of manufacturers.

Crispbreads are typically made from rye flour and probably originated in Scandinavia about 500 years ago. They are popular amongst people looking for high fibre and low calorie diets.

Image: testspiel under Creative Commons license

 

Rugbrød

Rugbrød is the wholesome and hearty Norwegian rye bread, a staple for every household.

Image: tuey under Creative Commons license

 
 

For further information, take a look at our frequently asked questions which may give you the support you need.

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