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Science, Maths & Technology
  • Activity
  • 5 mins
  • Level 1: Introductory

Virtual Microscope

Updated Wednesday 22nd June 2016

Examine moon rocks and meteorites up close with our Virtual Microscope

Explore the slide below to get up close and personal with some lunar soil (Orange regolith):

Moonrock detail seen through a microscope Copyrighted image Icon Copyright: The Open University Launch moon rock on the Virtual Microscope

And check out this British meteorite:

Moonrock detail seen through a microscope Copyrighted image Icon Copyright: The Open University Launch meteorite on the Virtual Microscope

 

To look at even more objects up close, from meteorites to igneous rocks, visit the main Virtual Microscope website.

Visit our Stargazing LIVE page to find out more about the series which celebrates the wonder of our amazing night sky and explore the story of the Universe with our interactives. Also enjoy free learning materials about the Moon and more.

 

For further information, take a look at our frequently asked questions which may give you the support you need.

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