Science, Maths & Technology
  • Activity
  • 5 mins
  • Level 1: Introductory

Spark it up!

Updated Thursday 11th August 2011

How many eels to power a laptop? Discover how much energy it takes to start up a variety of objects in this game developed to complement the series Shock and Awe: The Story of Electricity.

Spark it up launcher Launch Spark it Up

Click the image above to launch the Spark it Up game.

  • Watch a repeat of Shock and Awe: The Story of Electricity on Saturday 7th January at 8pm on BBC FOUR. Find out more at here.
  • Take your learning further with our Engineering the future course. 
  • Try this free taster on superconductivity.
 

For further information, take a look at our frequently asked questions which may give you the support you need.

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