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Society, Politics & Law
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  • 10 mins
  • Level 1: Introductory

Discuss: Working class leisure

Updated Tuesday 6th August 2013

From music hall to football to karaoke. Fill in our short leisure survey and share your thoughts and memories.

Sign on roof of bingo hall Creative commons image Icon By Chitrapa (Own work) [CC-BY-SA-3.0], via Wikimedia Commons under Creative-Commons license Leisure depends on free time, by definition something which is in short supply for working class people.

Yet working class leisure activities had thrived over the years, from music hall to football to karaoke. Doing what you can with what you’ve got has often been the watchword.

And we shouldn’t forget the gendering of leisure – women’s and girls sports for example, separated off from those of men.

We'd like you to share your thoughts with us and with each other. Here are some questions to ponder:

  • What makes leisure time?
  • Is leisure time the time you are not at work?
  • Does class matter or is popular culture and leisure available to everyone in some form?

Let us know your responses to the statements below, then give us some more of your thoughts, experiences and memories of working class leisure in the comments section lower down this page.

Once you've discussed leisure, you can visit other discussion hubs about working class work, housing, representation and struggle. You can also order a free journal of working class life to dig deeper in to each of these issues.

 

For further information, take a look at our frequently asked questions which may give you the support you need.

Have a question?

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