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Art and life in ancient Egypt
Art and life in ancient Egypt

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Acknowledgements

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see terms and conditions [Tip: hold Ctrl and click a link to open it in a new tab. (Hide tip)] ), this content is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Licence.

The material acknowledged below is Proprietary and used under licence (not subject to Creative Commons Licence). Grateful acknowledgement is made to the following sources for permission to reproduce material in this course:

In line with the British Museum’s wishes and aims to encourage the dissemination and use of information about their collections, The Open University is delighted to confirm that all content credited to © The Trustees of the British Museum is also made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0).

Figures

Figure 1 Nebamun hunting in the marshes (EA 37977) © Trustees of the British Museum

Figure 2 Hieroglyphs from the scene of hunting in the marshes, ‘Taking enjoyment, seeing good things in the place of eternity’ (EA 37977) © Trustees of the British Museum

Figure 3 The Temple of Amun Photograph courtesy of R. B. Parkinson

Figure 4 Hieroglyphs of Nebamun’s title and name, ‘Scribe and Grain-accountant of Amun, Nebamun’ © Trustees of the British Museum, Drawing by R. B. Parkinson 

Figure 5 Offering bringers with sheaves of grain (EA 37980) © Trustees of the British Museum

Figure 6 A table piled with food at banquet (EA 37986) © Trustees of the British Museum

Figure 7 Domenico di Michelino, Dante and his Poem, 1465, fresco, Santa Maria del Fiore, Florence  

Figure 8 Continuation of an idealised life (EA 37986) © Trustees of the British Museum

Figure 9 The funeral procession and burial of the scribe Ani from his Book of the Dead (EA 10470.5 © Trustees of the British Museum

Figure 10 Oval fruit-basket of woven palm fibre with lid; contains figs and dates (EA 5396) © Trustees of the British Museum

Figure 11 Wooden cosmetic-spoon (EA 5954) © Trustees of the British Museum

Figure 12 Ivory scribal palette bearing rough Hieratic jottings in black ink (EA 5524) © Trustees of the British Museum

Figure 13 The west bank escarpment looking towards the Valley of the Queens courtesy of R B Parkinson

Figure 14 A view of the Theban peak Courtesy of R. B. Parkinson

Figure 15 A view of Deir el-Bahri Courtesy of R. B. Parkinson

Figure 16 Part of Dra Abu el-Naga Courtesy of R. B. Parkinson

Figure 17 A reconstruction drawing of the outer parts of a Theban tomb-chapel, showing the courtyard and facade decorated with funerary cones Drawing by Claire Thorne after Kampp, Die Thebanische Nekropole (Mainz 1996), Fig. 67. © Trustees of the British Museum 

Figure 18 Impression of tomb-chapel layout A reconstruction by R. B. Parkinson. From Meredith Hooper, The Tomb of Nebamun: Explore an Ancient Egyptian Tomb (London 2008), 10-11

Figure 19 Plan and elevation of the Eighteenth Dynasty tomb-chapel of Nakht Drawing by Claire Thorne after Norman Davies, The Tomb of Nakht at Thebes (New York 1917), 36. © Trustees of the British Museum

Figure 20 Ostracon depicting a tomb (5886) Courtesy of The Manchester Museum, The University of Manchester

Figure 21 Long hall of Theban Tomb-chapel 147 Courtesy of Boyo Ockinga, Macquarie University, Australia

Figure 22 Statue of a couple from a Theban tomb-chapel (EA 2301) © Trustees of the British Museum

Figure 23 One of the graffiti From R. B. Parkinson, Voices From Ancient Egypt (London 1991), p. 148.

Figure 24 The eternal life of a tomb-chapel (EA37977, EA 37978, EA 37980, EA 37983, EA 37986) © Trustees of the British Museum.

Every effort has been made to contact copyright owners. If any have been inadvertently overlooked, the publishers will be pleased to make the necessary arrangements at the first opportunity.

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Week 5