Multiculturalism Bites: Track 3884

Featuring: Audio Audio

Multiculturalism is one of the most vexing political issues of our day. How can people with very different values and customs live alongside each other? What is the history of multiculturalism? What are the arguments for and against its various forms? Has it failed? Does it have a future? The Open University's Nigel Warburton interviews ten leading thinkers about the meaning and implications of multiculturalism. David Edmonds introduces each episode.

By: The iTunes U team (Programme and web teams)

  • Duration 3 hours
  • Updated Friday 8th July 2011
  • Introductory level
  • Posted under History & The Arts
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